Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 10th Nov 2011 20:45 UTC, submitted by Straylight
Oracle and SUN I just emerged, blinking, from the world of Skyrim, only to realise Sun Oracle has released the 11th version of Solaris (well, technically it's the 7th, but okay, we'll roll with it). I'll be honest and upfront about it: Solaris is totally out of my league, and as such, it's very hard for me to properly summarise what this release is all about, so I won't even try.
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lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

Doing specific things on Solaris is very different than Linux and BSD stuff ... It hard to explain IMO Solaris is as different to Linux as Windows is different to BSD ... massively.

Reply Parent Score: 0

Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Doing specific things on Solaris is very different than Linux and BSD stuff ... It hard to explain IMO Solaris is as different to Linux as Windows is different to BSD ... massively.

It really isn't.

I administrate a mixture of Linux and Solaris boxes and while there are a few quirks for Solaris I have to remember (eg vfstab instead of fstab, user space commands have slightly different switches, etc), but largely the skill sets are transferable (unlike building a Windows Server and then expecting the configuration of OpenBSD or FreeBSD to be similar).

In fact, you can configure (via shells, aliases or even compiling in your own user space tools) the two environments to behave more alike if you really struggle when switching platforms. Where as it's not really possible to do that with Win/BSD. While you can get a POSIX environment for Windows (cygwin) and slap a GUI on BSD, Windows and BSD are as different as night and day.

Reply Parent Score: 3

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

I administrate a mixture of Linux and Solaris boxes and while there are a few quirks for Solaris I have to remember (eg vfstab instead of fstab, user space commands have slightly different switches, etc), but largely the skill sets are transferable (unlike building a Windows Server and then expecting the configuration of OpenBSD or FreeBSD to be similar).

In fact, you can configure (via shells, aliases or even compiling in your own user space tools) the two environments to behave more alike if you really struggle when switching platforms. Where as it's not really possible to do that with Win/BSD. While you can get a POSIX environment for Windows (cygwin) and slap a GUI on BSD, Windows and BSD are as different as night and day.


That is the problem that they are so so similar I used to get confused ... especially in the labs when we were running Sun Ray thin clients that had a mixture of Redhat and Solaris.

I personally find Linux to be easier.

Reply Parent Score: 2

unoengborg Member since:
2005-07-06

I fail to see what's so different. To me, Solaris, Linux, MacOS X, FreeBSD,... are quite similar. Solaris is extremely well documented. It should not be a problem to manage for somebody with basic unix skills from some other unixlike environment.

Reply Parent Score: 2

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Solaris is as different to Linux as Windows is different to BSD

I use Solaris since v8 came out. In general it's not that hard to move between the Linux and Solaris, certainly not as hard as moving from Linux to default AIX. And if you use Nexenta then it's really not that different.

But then there's hardware configuration, firewall, zones and other lower level stuff that is massively different.

Reply Parent Score: 2