Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th Nov 2011 23:06 UTC
Google Finally! Jean-Baptiste Queru (yes, husband of) has announced the source code release for Android 4.0, Ice Cream Sandwich (technically, it's 4.0.1). Naturally, this code dump also happens to include the source code for Honeycomb - however, due to Honeycomb's incomplete nature, there's no tags available for it. Not interesting from a let's-build-it-and-code-point of view, but it is interesting for ROM hackers - bring it on, ICS for my Galaxy SII!
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phoenix
Member since:
2005-07-11

Hrm, wonder how many of the "Google isn't open", "Android isn't OSS", etc detractors will now retract their criticisms? ;)

What's really interesting, is that the source code is available before the first device that uses it is.

Will be interesting to see who releases an Adroid 4.0.x upgrade for an already-released phone/tablet first: modders or manufacturers. ;) My bet is on the modding community.

Reply Score: 9

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Obviously they were trolling. So I don't think that anyone will retract anything. Their response will be, en masse : "Sure it's open now, until Google decides otherwise"

Reply Parent Score: 5

_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17

Will be interesting to see who releases an Adroid 4.0.x upgrade for an already-released phone/tablet first: modders or manufacturers. ;) My bet is on the modding community.


Most likely... seeing as manufacturers need to do "verification" and "testing" before releasing anything (sometimes for a whole year like SE).

Reply Parent Score: 2

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Hrm, wonder how many of the "Google isn't open", "Android isn't OSS", etc detractors will now retract their criticisms? ;)


Well, I just saw this article on Ars:

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/news/2011/11/google-makes-android-4-...

And it makes me wonder if Android really benefits by being 'truly open', because you have devices like the Kindle fire that will release a bastardized version of Android, with anything relating to Google or the Android market removed, and locks users into a different app store.

That in itself isn't so bad, except that:

1. The media keeps insisting on calling the Fire an Android tablet, which it really isn't. This not only gives consumers the false impression that it can do anything an ordinary Android tablet can, but also that it is a real iPad competitor. People will use this as yet another example of Android fragmentation, which really isn't fair to Android, since Amazon doesn't even advertise it as an Android device.

2. It has the potential to splinter Android development, esp if the Fire really takes off, and developers start targeting it at the exclusion of all other Android devices.

I'm not necessarily saying that they shouldn't release the source code, but something like Android really needs a 'benevolent dictator' to call the shots, and demand (via the license) that at least a minimum set of requirements must be met if you want to fork it AND sell hardware with your forked code.

Edited 2011-11-15 00:33 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

Luminair Member since:
2007-03-30

And it makes me wonder if Android really benefits by being 'truly open'


Open source software and what a device does with it are two different things. Android benefits from being open, and what Kindle does is irrelevant.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

And it makes me wonder if Android really benefits by being 'truly open', because you have devices like the Kindle fire that will release a bastardized version of Android, with anything relating to Google or the Android market removed, and locks users into a different app store.


Are you sure it's locked down? Just a couple of hours ago I was chatting with a friend about it and he had read that people are already sideloading apps onto it without root access. Unfortunately I don't have a source to cite, so take it for what it is (third party hearsay) but if true that would be quite interesting.

Edited 2011-11-15 04:21 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

oakgrove Member since:
2009-06-21

You can side load Android apps onto the Fire. It most certainly is an Android tablet.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

Hrm, wonder how many of the "Google isn't open", "Android isn't OSS", etc detractors will now retract their criticisms? ;)

I still don't agree with the decision to develop in secret and after the fact open source it. This means that one of the best features of open source, developing the software together, is lost.

And to me Google isn't open if they are closed until release. Though still miles better than the competition. Maybe Mozilla can make a populair open mobile OS.

Edited 2011-11-15 10:45 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17

I still don't agree with the decision to develop in secret and after the fact open source it. This means that one of the best features of open source, developing the software together, is lost.


This is true, but then again google does not accept external patches beyond some bugfixes so it pretty much negates contribution in a centralized fashion. You'd end up having cyanogenmod pulling masses of code from google and merging external contributions...making them the defacto android tree...

Reply Parent Score: 3

shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

Releasing the source didn't make Android more open in the sense of open development, sorry to disappoint.

Reply Parent Score: 3