Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th Nov 2011 21:32 UTC, submitted by cristoper
Apple It's no secret OSNews has a bit of a thing for the BeOS. I can only speak for myself, obviously, but relatively speaking, BeOS was the best operating system ever made. The man who started all this was Jean-Louis Gassee, former executive at Apple, who founded Be, Inc. in 1991. In the second half of the '90s, Apple was looking for a replacement for its heavily outdated Mac OS, after several failed attempts at developing its own - it came down to Steve Jobs NeXT, or BeOS. Be didn't make it, and Gassee is happier for it.
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RE[8]: Software Souls
by Hexadecima on Tue 15th Nov 2011 21:55 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: Software Souls"
Hexadecima
Member since:
2010-09-01

You're assuming that the individual is aware of the connection; this isn't always the case. Have you ever had a smell that gave you a familiar feeling but you can't remember why? Or a memory that you can only half remember? Sometimes we make connections that we are unable to consciously self-diagnose.


Not remembering a smell or faint memory is one thing. Smells in particular are mediated by the lower temporal cortex, which is a more primitive area of the brain that forms extremely strong memories. As a result, it's inevitable that the significance of a smell lingers long after what it's associated with. These are the results of things not being important enough to remember. In the case of things so important that we declare love for them, we think about them consciously from time to time, and that prevents the kind of degradation you're describing.

too complicated for us to rationalise.


too complex to rationalise.


far more complicated than the average human can mentally decompile (which is also the reason why psychiatrists earn such a good wage)


...to be quite honest, it sounds like you're saying Thom is cognitively deficient. I may just need to settle for that.

I promise you, though, that if you sit down with just about any emotion you have and really think about it, you'll be able to figure out where it came from. Strong emotions are just a little more challenging to distance yourself from, so you can look at them objectively. Undergraduate psychiatry schooling is pretty much just a matter of giving students a boost in developing the skills necessary to do so; you can figure out anything on your own if you ask yourself "Why?" enough.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Software Souls
by Laurence on Wed 16th Nov 2011 08:02 in reply to "RE[8]: Software Souls"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


Not remembering a smell or faint memory is one thing. Smells in particular are mediated by the lower temporal cortex, which is a more primitive area of the brain that forms extremely strong memories. As a result, it's inevitable that the significance of a smell lingers long after what it's associated with. These are the results of things not being important enough to remember. In the case of things so important that we declare love for them, we think about them consciously from time to time, and that prevents the kind of degradation you're describing.

Nice side stepping there, but you're missing the point.
If something can trigger an emotional response based upon a memory you've forgotten, then it's impossible to rationalise that emotional response regardless of how scientific you wish to break down the process.

I promise you, though, that if you sit down with just about any emotion you have and really think about it, you'll be able to figure out where it came from. Strong emotions are just a little more challenging to distance yourself from, so you can look at them objectively. Undergraduate psychiatry schooling is pretty much just a matter of giving students a boost in developing the skills necessary to do so; you can figure out anything on your own if you ask yourself "Why?" enough.

I think you're over-estimating most peoples ability and desire to over-analyse every thought process.
Sometimes people are just content to have an emotion without needing to know every chemical and neural reaction that generated it

Reply Parent Score: 2