Linked by Howard Fosdick on Thu 17th Nov 2011 08:05 UTC
Legal A New York Times guest editorial titled Stop the Great Firewall of America says "China operates the world's most elaborate and opaque system of Internet censorship. But Congress... is considering misguided legislation that would strengthen China's Great Firewall and even bring major features of it to America." The culprit is the proposed Stop Online Piracy Act. Sounds good until you read that "The bills empower the attorney general to create a blacklist of sites to be blocked by Internet service providers, search engines, payment providers and advertising networks, all without a court hearing or a trial." Rather like the Department of Homeland Security's seizure of websites for copyright violations without the constitutionally-required court orders. If you're not an American citizen, why should you care? Read this Techdirt article telling how the U.S. seized a Spanish domain name that had already been declared legal by the Spanish courts.
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There's also
by neticspace on Thu 17th Nov 2011 11:07 UTC
neticspace
Member since:
2009-06-09

There's also the Great Firewall of South Korea, a masterpiece of the conservative government at present. Maybe internet censorship is a growing trend among democratic countries.

Reply Score: 3

RE: There's also
by v_bobok on Thu 17th Nov 2011 11:44 in reply to "There's also"
v_bobok Member since:
2008-08-01

>censorship
>democratic countries
You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2y8Sx4B2Sk

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: There's also
by ichi on Thu 17th Nov 2011 11:53 in reply to "RE: There's also"
ichi Member since:
2007-03-06

>censorship
>democratic countries
You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2y8Sx4B2Sk


While democracy is supposed to imply that all citizens have an equal say in decisions that affect their lives, it has actually come to mean that all you get is to choose a temporary dictator among a subset of candidates sponsored by private interests.

Reply Parent Score: 14

RE[2]: There's also
by pepa on Thu 17th Nov 2011 12:15 in reply to "RE: There's also"
pepa Member since:
2005-07-08

Democratic countries? What are these democratic countries of which you speak?

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: There's also
by zegenie on Thu 17th Nov 2011 12:21 in reply to "There's also"
zegenie Member since:
2005-12-31

There's also one here in Norway. Granted, it's for "preventing access to child pornography" - it's still a secret blacklist that all ISP needs to implement.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: There's also
by Laurence on Thu 17th Nov 2011 14:21 in reply to "RE: There's also"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

There's also one here in Norway. Granted, it's for "preventing access to child pornography" - it's still a secret blacklist that all ISP needs to implement.

Indeed, and that's just what happened here in the UK. Content holders have successfully forced some ISPs to use their child porn filter to blacklist a usenet search engine.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: There's also
by Lennie on Thu 17th Nov 2011 13:30 in reply to "There's also"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

And websites inside of South Korea only work with IE.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: There's also
by avgalen on Thu 17th Nov 2011 15:29 in reply to "RE: There's also"
avgalen Member since:
2010-09-23

No they don't!
Just some government sites use an ActiveX control for identification. (Which IS ridiculous in 2011)

Stop spreading FUD

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: There's also
by fukudasan on Thu 17th Nov 2011 14:04 in reply to "There's also"
fukudasan Member since:
2006-06-04

What, are you kidding me? I've had no trouble here at all. Seriously.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: There's also
by neticspace on Thu 17th Nov 2011 15:39 in reply to "RE: There's also"
neticspace Member since:
2009-06-09

Consider this. All the South Korean websites are monitored by the government's presidential agency. The police agencies and the Supreme Prosecutors' Office can track almost every post you wrote through your Residence Registration Number. They can imprison you with "internet" evidences.

Reply Parent Score: 2