Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 27th Nov 2011 22:07 UTC, submitted by Nooone
Linux So, it's no secret that the Linux desktop - at least, the GNOME-side of things - is a bit in a state of disarray. Unity hasn't exactly gone down well with a lot of people, and GNOME 3, too, hasn't been met with universal praise. So, what to do? Linux Mint, currently one of the most popular Linux distributions out there, thinks they are on to the solution with their latest release, Linux Mint 12.
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stabbyjones
Member since:
2008-04-15

The first point you make is about the name again?

The only point you make is about RPM and i have to say that I haven't got a good RPM knowledge after 2002.

But, I have looked at how RPM distros manage their packages. No matter how good RPM has become I have yet to see an RPM-based package manager beat even synaptic in practice.

The package managers are what drag RPM down.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Finalzone Member since:
2005-07-06

The first point you make is about the name again?

The only point you make is about RPM and i have to say that I haven't got a good RPM knowledge after 2002.

But, I have looked at how RPM distros manage their packages. No matter how good RPM has become I have yet to see an RPM-based package manager beat even synaptic in practice.


Ahem, Synaptic is a frontend for apt. SUSE uses zipper, Mandriva/Maiega uses urpmi and Fedora and its variants yum. Once again, you fall into the trap comparing rpm with apt.

Reply Parent Score: 2

stabbyjones Member since:
2008-04-15

"I have yet to see an RPM-based package manager beat even synaptic in practice." - me

I said I can't comment on specifics of RPM and I haven't. The simple act of using packages managers on RPM distros is painful.

Reply Parent Score: 2

_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17

Actually yast and zypper are quite good, with yast being perfectly functional but a bit weird on the ui design.

However I find yum to be slow, fragile and (on fedora at least) packageKit frontends to be utterly sucky and compound the problems even further (by compound I meant break everything, lock everything, crash and generally provide only pain)

I have never tried mandriva package management, so I can't comment there.

Apt is a much more simple package format than rpm, which is probably why it is generally considered to be better. Simplicity = fewer problems.

Personally my favorite is pacman from Arch, which is hands down the simplest to grasp (even if there is no decent ui to go with it).

Edited 2011-11-29 23:37 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Jason Bourne Member since:
2007-06-02

But, I have looked at how RPM distros manage their packages. No matter how good RPM has become I have yet to see an RPM-based package manager beat even synaptic in practice.

The package managers are what drag RPM down.


Yes, the name is quite stupid. Deborah + Ian... it can't be more amateur than this. Perhaps naming a puppy or a cat like that would suit better. Let me express that I find Ubuntu an ugly name, as well as Fedora. But they are ugly just for the sake of their own ugliness. Not a big deal: I find this way because they are close to ugly words in my native language which is portuguese. But Debian!? WTF. Arch name is OK. Not the nicest but it's alright.

The Debian logo is quite ugly too. I certainly don't know why it is called "Universal Operating System". I have installed Debian once but... it was boring. I would have to check that again. I can give credit to Debian as for apt/dpkg in its glorious days, which worked and works quite well.

I like to keep bringing these points up because commercial software teaches us lessons. XFCE, weird names, don't get us anywhere.

Synaptic has been dropped off Ubuntu and I don't know any newbie user who uses it. Everyone is switching off to less complex package front-ends. Synaptic surely is good. But Delta & Presto for RPM with PackageKit sweeps everything away. I don't use Fedora, but the guy who saw the need for delta rpm plugin really thought over this update cycle mess. Why do we have to download an entire package again? And last time I checked neither apt tools or front-ends actually do that.

Gnome Package Kit already uses delta rpm technology. It suffers a bit from lack of information, but I never used synaptic anymore after PK.

Reply Parent Score: 1