Linked by David Adams on Wed 30th Nov 2011 20:23 UTC
Editorial A reader asks: "Can someone comment on the legality of using my brother's old Snow Leopard DVD to install OS X? My brother has Lion, so why can't he choose to give it to me? It doesn't violate Apple's 1 license per 1 computer policy."
Thread beginning with comment 498481
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Another few steps to stir up the silt
by jabbotts on Wed 30th Nov 2011 20:53 UTC
jabbotts
Member since:
2007-09-06

The question seemed to indicate that the one person had moved from 10.6 to 10.7 installed on the machine. This providing the 10.6 install DVD for the second person.

An issue to be aware of here is that 10.7 is likely considered an upgrade not a fresh install. The machine is being upgraded from 10.6 to 10.7 and 10.7 was sold at a low cost based on the expectation that the machine was already running a legal 10.6 install. They may make an argument that both 10.6 and 10.7 install media belong to the one (now) 10.7 machine rather than the upgrade freeing 10.6 up for install on another machine.

I'm not deeply familair with Apple licensing policy though. That's just the issue that came to mind based on the age old Microsoft trick of "upgrade" installs requiring validation of the prior "full install" version it was meant to replace. It's a friggin pain too because now you have to keep the install media for the prior version encase you have to prove that you are upgrading during a re-install of the newer version.

Reply Score: 6

henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

The question seemed to indicate that the one person had moved from 10.6 to 10.7 installed on the machine. This providing the 10.6 install DVD for the second person.


I believe the issue is even more troublesome. There are two ways to obtain Snow Leopard. 1) buy a disc, 2) buy the bundle (iLife 09 and iWork 09 plus SL.) Option (1) is an UPGRADE. I'm not clear if option (2) is an upgrade or not. So, unless the user has a fully licensed Leopard disc (one for every SL instance) or possibly got a bundle, the first option is definitely not conforming to the license the disc was sold under.

Reply Parent Score: 2

vtolkov Member since:
2006-07-26

There are two ways to obtain Snow Leopard...


There are two ways to obtain Lion: 1) Buy it with a new computer. 2) Buy an upgrade in the App Store.

So, in the first case you have two computers with two licenses, in the second - one computer with one license.

Using previous version disk is not any different from using the latest version disk. Can you take your brother's Lion disk and install it on another computer?

Reply Parent Score: 2

dizzey Member since:
2005-10-15

Yeah but there is a problem with the upgrade take.
First for me personally if you can install it on a empty system it is not an upgrade. when you upgrade something you build on the previous generation.

And then there is the practical problems i have gotten mac's delivered without a os. I got them from the university that had some kind of bulk software deal.
Ok
so now i have used mac's whiteout an os where do i buy the full version of OSx to install on these machines.

Well you cant since apple only sells upgrades or....

Reply Parent Score: 1