Linked by David Adams on Wed 30th Nov 2011 20:18 UTC, submitted by Oren
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless With WebOS out of the picture and the Blackberry Playbook as good as gone as well, we really only have iOS and Android left until Windows 8 comes out. I’ve finally gotten around to getting an Android device myself and spent the last week trying to see if my theoretical knowledge of the system and what I remember from the last Android device I had (which ran 1.6, viewed as ancient in Android land) fits reality. Read on for a full tear down and comparison on the two OSes.
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RE: Comment by werterr
by WorknMan on Wed 30th Nov 2011 22:14 UTC in reply to "Comment by werterr"
WorknMan
Member since:
2005-11-13

If there are only these two choices I have to say IOS. Because in my experience Android just does not work.


Actually, Android does work... you just have to stick with vanilla Android, or something close to it. This means, for the time being, don't buy any Android phone that doesn't have the 'Nexus' name on it. Pass on all the bullshit skinned 'Frankenandroid' phones and their 3-6 month update cycles.

For tablets, it's the Asus Transformer all the way. Get the Prime if you can afford it (which will be out in a week or two), or the first gen one if you're on a budget.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by werterr
by darknexus on Thu 1st Dec 2011 01:10 in reply to "RE: Comment by werterr"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Couldn't agree more. All of these manufacturer and carrier-specific Android roms are a headache. It puts me in mind of the days of Windows Mobile (ugh!!!!) when there were so many slightly different versions of that beast, all with their individual quirks. That is, I've found, an inevitable downside to free software. Fragmentation is a given. Hopefully, Google's more strict requirements for their approval (which most manufacturers do care about, for the Android market if nothing else) will at least curb this excess of fragmentation. I doubt we'll ever be entirely rid of it however.

Reply Parent Score: 2