Linked by David Adams on Sun 11th Dec 2011 01:37 UTC, submitted by rhyder
Linux It's starting to look like the end of an era for Ubuntu users as Canonical mull the creation of an ISO that won't fit onto a CDR. The question is, does it matter? Canonical owes at least part of its success with Ubuntu Linux to the unique way that it has been distributed. From the start it has been available as a downloadable ISO image and a free CD, posted at no cost to the user. This was great news for people who wanted to install Linux but did not have the luxury of a decent Internet connection. In a sense, installing via a CDR image has always been like a kind of cache, in that you're moving part of the content that you need onto permanent storage rather than pulling it through the network connection
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Just a symptom
by izomiac on Sun 11th Dec 2011 02:54 UTC
izomiac
Member since:
2006-07-26

Personally, I'd worry if your install size keeps increasing without adding major new features. If anything, your code should be decreasing in size as it matures. You also have to be mindful to remove and refactor redundant code when you do add new features, lest you double your potential for bugs while reducing performance.

Of course, that's just me and my penchant for minimalism. Fewer parts generally means fewer bugs, more speed, and much easier to fix.

Reply Score: 14

RE: Just a symptom
by gnemmi on Sun 11th Dec 2011 04:04 in reply to "Just a symptom"
gnemmi Member since:
2006-08-17

^ that

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Just a symptom
by ilovebeer on Sun 11th Dec 2011 06:03 in reply to "Just a symptom"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

Personally, I'd worry if your install size keeps increasing without adding major new features. If anything, your code should be decreasing in size as it matures. You also have to be mindful to remove and refactor redundant code when you do add new features, lest you double your potential for bugs while reducing performance.

I generally agree with this.


Of course, that's just me and my penchant for minimalism. Fewer parts generally means fewer bugs, more speed, and much easier to fix.

I do not agree with that at all. It's possible to reduce things to the point where you actually wind up with more code and/or more potential bugs once you've addressed all the specific cases using conditional checks. Also, smaller code doesn't mean faster code.

I'm a bit of a minimalist myself but there are certainly times when it's a disadvantage.

As far as giving CDR sizes consideration... Who gives a damn? I sure don't. I can't remember the last time I installed anything from a CD. For that matter, I can't remember the last time I had a CD drive in a box, and I currently only have one box with a DVD drive in it. With cheap USB and SDHC options, why bother?

Edited 2011-12-11 06:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Just a symptom
by AdamW on Mon 12th Dec 2011 03:38 in reply to "Just a symptom"
AdamW Member since:
2005-07-06

I don't have experience with Ubuntu directly, but it's likely this is nothing to do with things getting bigger over time. It's never been possible to fit all the things on a CD-sized image that people actually want in a distro; this was a problem for Mandrake/Mandriva and MEPIS and SUSE back before Ubuntu even *existed*. Fitting a distro into 700MB has always been a trade-off, and distros have been considering moving to larger sized images for many years.

I can speak to Fedora from knowledge, and we've *decreased* the size of a live image with a given set of software in it over time, not increased it. But 700MB is still not really enough to fit in everything that everyone wants.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Just a symptom
by Neolander on Mon 12th Dec 2011 11:06 in reply to "RE: Just a symptom"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Even on a bluray it would be impossible to stick everything people might possibly want.

Let's say I'm a gamer. For perfect OOB experience, I'd like my OS to come with the latest games and video drivers, so that I don't have to buy or download them separately. Should Windows include unactivated copies of Skyrim, Battlefield 3, or whatever else is trendy at the moment ? Should a new release of Windows come out each time a new game or Nvidia driver is out ? If I'm into photo editing, should Windows come with Photoshop ?

CD or DVD, there is always a line to draw. In my opinion, OSs should ship with what is necessary to manage hardware and run most software. Everything else is a nice extra, which is here to demonstrate the capabilities of the OS and satisfy needs shared by more than 90% of users, but must not go in the way of the main purpose.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Just a symptom
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Mon 12th Dec 2011 16:24 in reply to "Just a symptom"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

These are distributions we are talking about. Their primary purpose is to package together various other programs and present them as a working Operating System.

I for one, prefer distros that do not radically rewrite programs without working with the upstream to get the changes changes included. As such, the main responsibility for re factoring/ reducing code size should be the individual projects themselves.

Reply Parent Score: 2