Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 15th Dec 2011 16:56 UTC
Internet Explorer As it turns out, Google's idea of silently and automatically updating web browsers for security's sake is actually a pretty darn good idea - Chrome is pretty much always up-to-date. Microsoft agrees with this, and has announced it's going to automatically update Internet Explorer on Windows XP, Vista and 7.
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Not too excited by these news
by dquadros on Thu 15th Dec 2011 17:21 UTC
dquadros
Member since:
2010-01-20

The reason I do not use Chrome is that its EULA requires that you use only the latest version. It will download and install new version whenever it wants and you can do nothing about it (except say goodbye to Chrome).

Firefox is testing my patience with a new (n+1).0 version every month, that breaks all the Add-ons (and Add-ons was one of the reasons for using Firefox).

I want the freedom to decide if and when I will upgrade. I also expect good backwards compatibility and a sensible version numbering scheme.

Edited 2011-12-15 17:22 UTC

Reply Score: 9

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Microsoft are providing a tool to do that.

My main concern is that I particularly hate churn change, security updates in version is fine ... but behavioural changes would be a problem IMO.

Reply Parent Score: 4

ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

Firefox is testing my patience with a new (n+1).0 version every month, that breaks all the Add-ons (and Add-ons was one of the reasons for using Firefox).


I use around 30 plugins and none of them have broken because of the new Firefox versioning. Guess you just have bad luck. *shrug*

Reply Parent Score: 2

fran Member since:
2010-08-06

I had a experience with a IE6 plugin that made me realise just how expensive and serious the problem can be.
The short version is it involved $6000 worth of MRI scans a surgeon could not read because the scan file only run on a IE6 plugin. Incidently he upgraded from IE6 long time ago.
I was not angry at Microsoft, but at companies that choose to run such files in a browsers based plugin and not updating their plugins.

Reply Parent Score: 1

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

NoScript
Convergence
Pentadactyle
Ghostery

When Chrome has those plugins available then I'll have a hard time not changing primary browsers. I'm not sure that NotScript is the same as NoScript. Pentadactyle is there I think but haven't checked the latest. Ghostery I haven't looked for at all. Convergence is going to be a while before it shows up.

There are a number of other more interesting plugins I keep handy but for those types of special needs I can always keep a use dedicated FF install handy.

Reply Parent Score: 3

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Ghostery is already in the Chrome store btw

Reply Parent Score: 2

Finalzone Member since:
2005-07-06

Firefox is testing my patience with a new (n+1).0 version every month, that breaks all the Add-ons (and Add-ons was one of the reasons for using Firefox).


Have you installed Add-ons compatibility reporter?
https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/add-on-compatibility-...

That addons will do a great service to report Mozilla about broken addons.

Reply Parent Score: 2

UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

LMFAO... you know the situation has gotten out of hand when there's a damn add-on to tell you how many others of your add-ons will not work with the latest Mozilla seemingly monthly, minimal-change, high version inflation release. This just goes to show how pathetic the situation really is.

Edited 2011-12-16 01:03 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Damnshock Member since:
2006-09-15

The reason I do not use Chrome is that its EULA requires that you use only the latest version. It will download and install new version whenever it wants and you can do nothing about it (except say goodbye to Chrome).


Use Chromium instead.

I want the freedom to decide if and when I will upgrade.


Man, use a package manager!

Reply Parent Score: 2

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

I don't like how Chrome works and I can't trust Chromium either.

Ever since they made a mistake where cookies/ids got send to Google and could be correlated even in Chromium not just Chrome.

I feel I just can't trust Chromium, it is better than the situation with Microsoft obviously because the source isn't even available.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

The reason I do not use Chrome is that its EULA requires that you use only the latest version. It will download and install new version whenever it wants and you can do nothing about it (except say goodbye to Chrome).

Firefox is testing my patience with a new (n+1).0 version every month, that breaks all the Add-ons (and Add-ons was one of the reasons for using Firefox).

I want the freedom to decide if and when I will upgrade. I also expect good backwards compatibility and a sensible version numbering scheme.


Firefox doesn't break add-ons ... although some addons (hosted external to addons.mozilla.org) do break themselves.

By this I mean that addons themselves check the browser version that they are running under. If the browser versions says it is higher than expected by the addon, the addon simply declares ITSELF incompatible, whether it actually is, or not.

In truth, well over 99% of addons will still work fine under a new version number, even if the addons themselves think they won't. You can download a tool from the addons.mozilla.org site, called the Addon compatibility Reporter, that will force a recalcitrant addon to run even if the addon has declared itself incompatible. This tool will let you re-instate the majority of addons that have refused to run under a new browser version.

Reply Parent Score: 1

pulse301 Member since:
2009-09-03

The reason I do not use Chrome is that its EULA requires that you use only the latest version. It will download and install new version whenever it wants and you can do nothing about it (except say goodbye to Chrome).


Although the EULA does say you have to stay up to date, Google released an Administrative template for group policies to disable the auto update, and there are also registry keys to disable it. We use the group policy at work so that we can test updates before they are pushed to make sure it doesn't break our Chrome Frame enabled software.

http://www.sitepoint.com/how-to-disable-google-chrome-updates/

Reply Parent Score: 1