Linked by David Adams on Tue 20th Dec 2011 06:06 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless 2011 will go down in the history books as a great year for tablets mostly for Apple's iPad however, not all tablet vendors fared as well as Apple. It's not for lack of products that prevented Android tablets from taking any market share away from Apple this year. By our calculation, over 100 tablets were introduced since the iPad however, we defy even the most tech-savvy of you to name more than a few of them. What was so wrong with the competition that it failed to make any inroads in the tablet market, at least until the Amazon Kindle Fire and Barnes & Noble Nook came along?
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RE[2]: I have a need for a tablet
by Neolander on Wed 21st Dec 2011 08:32 UTC in reply to "RE: I have a need for a tablet"
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

What's with this thinking that one needs to lock down everything in order to make usable products ?

One every bike I've ever bought, I could service everything myself, using a relatively standard interface. This characteristic also makes the life of my mechanic easier for stuff which I can't do or don't want to do.

Please explain how this makes bikes hard to use for people who don't want to bother and just see the mechanic each time the chain goes off the gears.

If you can't, please explain how tablets are different from bikes in this area.

Edited 2011-12-21 08:32 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

What's with this thinking that one needs to lock down everything in order to make usable products ?

One every bike I've ever bought, I could service everything myself, using a relatively standard interface. This characteristic also makes the life of my mechanic easier for stuff which I can't do or don't want to do.

Please explain how this makes bikes hard to use for people who don't want to bother and just see the mechanic each time the chain goes off the gears.

If you can't, please explain how tablets are different from bikes in this area.


Absolute bull!

Apart from the simplest of services on a bicycle (allen key jobs), the same manufacturer might have 4 different tools for 4 different component types that are all incompatible.

E.g.

Shimano Bottom brackets. There are

* Square Taper JIS
* Square Taper ISO
* Octalink
* ISIS
* Hollow Tech 1
* Hollow Tech 2
* External bottom bracket designs (very new)

That is just for 1 component and they all require different tools. Bikes with ISO standard threads (68mm bottom bracket shell length).

You could have French (old and rare), Swiss (old and rare), Italian (phased out but plenty of bikes use it) and a whole different standard for BMX altogether.

For 1 component we have 24 possible tools needed already.

Modern Bicycle Technology is very proprietary. Let me tell you, it is really hard trying to get standard ISO kit that is compatible with anything older than 10 years (some of my bicycles are 40+ years old). In the 1970-1990s most manufacturers decided to use ISO standard kit (based off the British ISO standard which was largely superior to the other standards) ... unfortunately due to Mountain Biking and People wanting flashier bikes ... these standards have gone out the window.

People on here complain about the odd incompatibility between Word and Libre Office ... I have to hunt for parts on ebay or word of mouth (no internet) or make stuff myself.

Don't even get me started about headsets or suspension forks, handle bars, quill stems etc.

/rant over

Back OT

Also you comment is totally missing the point, we are talking about the interface between the person and the machine not how you repair it.

99% of all bicycles work more or less the same with minor difference, unless you have a penny farthing, a recumberate or a fixed gear.

Edited 2011-12-21 18:31 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Back OT

Also you comment is totally missing the point, we are talking about the interface between the person and the machine not how you repair it.

99% of all bicycles work more or less the same with minor difference, unless you have a penny farthing, a recumberate or a fixed gear.

Not quite. The OP of this thread stated "I want a tablet on which I can install Linux, Java, Python, etc... if I want to".

For me, this falls in the "easily serviceable" category. A device can provide this kind of option, typically with a "root switch" deep in the settings or an unlocked bootloader, without harming the normal user experience in anyway.

I stand corrected about bikes, though ;) I was thinking about low- and mid-end hybrid bikes (sub-600€), which is what I'm familiar with. On those, you really know what to expect, except for a few nonstandard oddities like saddle tube thickness or tire width. From that point, I was incorrectly assuming that the rest of the bike world just follows.

Edited 2011-12-22 08:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1