Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 21st Dec 2011 18:56 UTC
Windows Windows 8 will be one of the most significant releases for Microsoft ever, since it pretty much rethinks the entire graphical user interface. One of the problems I personally see with Metro is that it doesn't appear to be particularly conducive to getting actual work done. In an interview with The Verge, Microsoft design director Steve Kaneko confirmed that it's hard to adapt applications like Office to use Metro.
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Comment by FealDorf
by FealDorf on Wed 21st Dec 2011 21:39 UTC
FealDorf
Member since:
2008-01-07

While metro may become niche and MS back away from it as "The One Paradigm", I don't think it will affect the sales that badly. Tablet users won't care for mulitasking that much, while desktops and laptops are more likely to be x86 for various reasons, especially backwards compatibility.
Since W8 is "metro only" on ARM alone, while it is bound to rouse agitation, I suspect it won't be much. People will figure a hack to default it to Explorer instead of Metro.

That said, I'm disappointed that MS couldn't do the impossible, of bringing the power of Office to the elegance of Metro. If they do manage to achieve this, then it will give birth to a new form of touch interfaces no doubt.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by FealDorf
by TemporalBeing on Thu 22nd Dec 2011 18:37 in reply to "Comment by FealDorf"
TemporalBeing Member since:
2007-08-22

While metro may become niche and MS back away from it as "The One Paradigm", I don't think it will affect the sales that badly. Tablet users won't care for mulitasking that much, while desktops and laptops are more likely to be x86 for various reasons, especially backwards compatibility.
Since W8 is "metro only" on ARM alone, while it is bound to rouse agitation, I suspect it won't be much. People will figure a hack to default it to Explorer instead of Metro.

That said, I'm disappointed that MS couldn't do the impossible, of bringing the power of Office to the elegance of Metro. If they do manage to achieve this, then it will give birth to a new form of touch interfaces no doubt.



Any "Metro" like product Microsoft has sold - e.g. Zune, WinPhone7, etc - have all been met with no market share. Pushing the interface to their mainline product will not solve the problem that people are not interested in the new interface.

So yes, expect it to affect sales as:

- a lot of their sales comes from the volume sales business to SMBs and Enterprise organizations, all of whom will not be able to use Metro without an Office like application.
- home users may get stuck with it through having to buy at shops that don't offer anything else, but they may see less reason to buy a new PC as a result, or may finally realize that they don't need Windows at all and go with a tablet instead.
- don't expect Win8 Tablets to sell like hotcakes any better than WinPhone7 did. The Windows brand in the tablet market is not very well known, and not known for quality. If they are able to get a good rep with Win8 on a tablet then they might have a chance with Win9, but only if the company survives long enough to deliver Win9.

This interview and the information about Office not being easy to port to Win8/Metro or that the interface functionality provided by Win8/Metro doesn't meet the needs of large applications like Office only further supports the IDC report that Win8 will be largely an irrelevant platform.

Of course, Microsoft will make it sound like Win8 is selling like hotcakes through the same tactics they did with WinVista and Win7:
- count sales of downgrading customers as sales of the new product
- count sales of customers upgrading from one edition of the product to another (e.g. Win8 Starter to Win8 Home Premium) as separate sales.
- count volume license sales twice: (i) one for the volume license, and (ii) for the license for the PC the volume license goes on[1].


[1] Microsoft states that even though you have spent millions on a volume license you still may not have the rights to use Windows on the PC on which you are installing it unless you continue to use the license that also came with the PC. Thereby you need two licenses when you otherwise would have only needed one.

Reply Parent Score: 3