Linked by Anonymous on Wed 21st Dec 2011 23:38 UTC
Gnome "Clement Lefebvre, the Linux Mint founder, has started working on a GNOME Shell fork called Cinnamon, which tries to offer a layout similar to GNOME 2, with emphasis on 'making users feel at home and providing them with an easy to use and comfortable desktop experience'. Among the features that we'll probably see in Cinnamon are GNOME2-like notifications and systray icons, option to change the panel position and other panel options like autohide, etc. Some of these features are already available through Mint GNOME Shell Extensions (MGSE), but their functionality is pretty limited."
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RE: Comment by mieses
by MacMan on Thu 22nd Dec 2011 17:07 UTC in reply to "Comment by mieses"
MacMan
Member since:
2006-11-19

Why was the parent moded down, he's absolutely right.

IMO, Gnome 2 is a copy (actually a really bad copy) of the Windows 95 desktop. Why bad, well, for starters, to freaking add a menu item, you have to go through about 50 dialogs to create a shortcut, choose an icon, what command to run, this is freaking BS, whereas with Windows 95, at least I could drag an icon to the main menu and it would show up as a menu item.


Anyway, look at Windows 8 and OSX lion, MS is FINALLY getting away from the Windows 95 desktop, and Apple is going, well, not sure where Apple is going, but they're going away from the traditional OSX interface.

Whats really really nice about Gnome 3 is that IT DOES NOT COPY WINDOWS OR OSX, they came up with they're own design! Now its not perfect, I think clicking on activities then dock is stupid, but this is really easy to change with just a bit of Javascript.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: Comment by mieses
by alcibiades on Fri 23rd Dec 2011 08:57 in reply to "RE: Comment by mieses"
alcibiades Member since:
2005-10-12

...well, for starters, to freaking add a menu item, you have to go through about 50 dialogs to create a shortcut, choose an icon, what command to run, this is freaking BS, whereas with Windows 95, at least I could drag an icon to the main menu and it would show up as a menu item.


Very strange comment. All you do is right click and add from menu. Whenever you do an install of an app, it shows up in the menu. Don't get it. This is so simple even real technophobes can do it. Now, how exactly you do that on KDE4? There you really do have to jump through hoops. Gnome3? Life is too short. But Gnome2 its a snap.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by mieses
by MacMan on Fri 23rd Dec 2011 18:13 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by mieses"
MacMan Member since:
2006-11-19


Very strange comment. All you do is right click and add from menu. Whenever you do an install of an app, it shows up in the menu.


Oh really???

Might be true for an app somebody that is in the package manager, these are typically relatively old versions.

What if I install an app NOT in the package manager. Say I install a new version of Eclipse, first have to copy Eclipse somewhere, then to get it in the Gnome menu, have to open the menu editor, choose the path of the app, fill out what command line to use, then have to browse around to find an icon. Ridiculous!!!

On Windows 95, 15 freaking years ago, I could just take an app, drag it to the start menu, drop it in the place I wanted and it worked.

Its absolutely ludicrous that I need a "menu editor" to change the Gnome menu, and that it does not support drag and drop editing.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by mieses
by Soulbender on Sun 25th Dec 2011 10:39 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by mieses"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Now, how exactly you do that on KDE4


You install an app and then it shows up in the menu. Very simple.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by mieses
by r_a_trip on Fri 23rd Dec 2011 11:42 in reply to "RE: Comment by mieses"
r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

Whats really really nice about Gnome 3 is that IT DOES NOT COPY WINDOWS OR OSX, they came up with they're own design!

Granted. The design is original. It's just too bad that it doesn't fit in with any efficient use of a desktop machine (desktop, laptop, netbook) and as a mobile interface it is dead on arrival. I just don't see it dethroning iOS or Android, nor reach a 0.001% installed base on tablets.

The real tragedy in this is that the Gnome dev team has created a lot of worthwhile desktop components with Gnome 3, with the potential to create a really exhillerating desktop, but they chose to combine them in the least attractive way.

Reply Parent Score: 4