Linked by David Adams on Tue 20th Dec 2011 06:06 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless 2011 will go down in the history books as a great year for tablets mostly for Apple's iPad however, not all tablet vendors fared as well as Apple. It's not for lack of products that prevented Android tablets from taking any market share away from Apple this year. By our calculation, over 100 tablets were introduced since the iPad however, we defy even the most tech-savvy of you to name more than a few of them. What was so wrong with the competition that it failed to make any inroads in the tablet market, at least until the Amazon Kindle Fire and Barnes & Noble Nook came along?
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lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

Well like it or not this is the route that is computing is going to take. Pretty much most computing tasks can be done on even the cheapest computers now.

Also could we stop making FUD up about secure boot? It gets tiring.

Edited 2011-12-22 23:34 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Well like it or not this is the route that is computing is going to take. Pretty much most computing tasks can be done on even the cheapest computers now.

Indeed, the computing market is mature now. Guess that's why hardware and proprietary OS vendors want so desperately to lock down everything on future generations of computers : it gives them a new way to artificial obsolescence, now that no one actually needs more powerful computers.

"So, we are very sorry, but we can't bother to pull a major security update to you phone that's less than two years old. What ? You could update the OS the way we want on every laptop and desktop before ? Well, this is not a laptop, deal with it."

Also could we stop making FUD up about secure boot? It gets tiring.

Not until the UEFI spec will feature a clear and universally accessible way to add third-party signing key to the key database, or in the worst case makes the ability to disable secure boot mandatory.

Edited 2011-12-23 09:00 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18


Indeed, the computing market is mature now. Guess that's why hardware and proprietary OS vendors want so desperately to lock down everything on future generations of computers : it gives them a new way to artificial obsolescence, now that no one actually needs more powerful computers.

"So, we are very sorry, but we can't bother to pull a major security update to you phone that's less than two years old. What ? You could update the OS the way we want on every laptop and desktop before ? Well, this is not a laptop, deal with it."


As I said the computing industry isn't nearly as locked down as the bicycle industry or the motoring industry and tbh I don't think it is possible for it to become as locked down.

Most of the cars that were pre-1990s most jobs could be done with a box of spanners.

People go mental because computers have become a consumer product ... but don't go up in arms with all the lock in from things like cars, motorbikes etc ... Powerful, clever and rich people have been exploiting the masses since the dawn of humanity, this won't change

Not until the UEFI spec will feature a clear and universally accessible way to add third-party signing key to the key database, or in the worst case makes the ability to disable secure boot mandatory.


Manufacturers and Microsoft would get shafted by the EU if there wasn't an option to disable it.

In anycase if you want ensure there is the ability to turn secure boot off, make sure you buy the appropriate hardware. It is kinda like buying a Laptop certified for Windows 7 and then complaining that OpenBSD doesn't work perfectly on it ... WELL DUH!

Edited 2011-12-23 11:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2