Linked by fran on Sat 24th Dec 2011 10:08 UTC
Windows "The new Windows PowerShell is coming. Actually, Microsoft has just launched a Community Technology Preview of Windows PowerShell version 3, although the final version 3 probably won’t ship until it comes out with Windows 8. It also will be available for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. The CTP will install on those OSes."
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Monad
by evert on Sat 24th Dec 2011 11:34 UTC
evert
Member since:
2005-07-06

I remember the time that the ugly thing was still called Monad. After Monad, I never tried it again.

"CLI with a GUI" WFT...

The whole ecosystem is not really CLI oriented. Doing simple work inside the CLI is hard because many basic tools (e.g. good text editors, text-based browsers) are lacking.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Monad
by BrianH on Sat 24th Dec 2011 18:39 in reply to "Monad"
BrianH Member since:
2005-07-06

The whole ecosystem is not really CLI oriented. Doing simple work inside the CLI is hard because many basic tools (e.g. good text editors, text-based browsers) are lacking.


Your point about text-based browsers could be valid, but all of the major text-based browsers have been ported to Windows. We just don't use them because the many GUI browsers on the platform are much better. But you are completely off about the text editors. There are dozens of programming editors for Windows, including ports of most of the ones available for other platforms, even the text-based ones.

What you might have missed since PowerShell was still called Monad is that more and more of the Windows services have been changed to make them easier to automate with PowerShell. SQL Server even bundles and requires it now. Many existing applications can be automated with it as well, since it operates on the .NET and COM infrastructure that most major applications are built on nowadays.

I think you might be missing the point of all this. PowerShell is just there to give us a good way to control a platform that was already able to be automated. We just didn't have a good tool that was built around the semantic model of the platform. The old tools were either Unix ports built around files, or COM tools - it's much easier to automate COM from .NET than the reverse. The fact that there's a CLI is more of a side-benefit, not the point of it all.

If you really want to you can make changes straight from the CLI using any cross-platform standard text editor, or even develop from scratch. Most people on Windows don't want to do that though, since their GUI tools are as good or better than those. There's no problem with that.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Monad
by Neolander on Sun 25th Dec 2011 00:08 in reply to "RE: Monad"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Slightly OT : I still have to find a fully satisfying programming-grade text editor for Windows. Notepad++ and SciTE look like stuff from the last century as compared to modern Kile or GEdit...

I've heard good things about UltraEdit, but it still feels somewhat weird to pay for a text editor.

Edited 2011-12-25 00:09 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3