Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 27th Dec 2011 16:24 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless And another case of the internet apparently wielding more influence than it seems to. To much dismay, Samsung announced last week that several of its popular smartphones, most notably the Samsung Galaxy S, would not be getting an upgrade to Ice Cream Sandwich. The internet backlash was palpable, and today, word on the street is that Samsung is reconsidering its position.
Thread beginning with comment 501357
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Comment by Kroc
by Kroc on Tue 27th Dec 2011 16:46 UTC
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

There is something so very wrong with the whole mobile market if in the span of 18 months, 512 MB of RAM on something in your pocket is not "big enough" for *anything*.

Cripes! It’s madness. I had 512 MB of RAM on my PC a decade ago, it was way more than enough then, and you can still comfortably run the latest Firefox on Windows XP in 512 MB of RAM now.

With throwaway hardware comes throwaway software. It sickens me.

Edited 2011-12-27 16:47 UTC

Reply Score: 6

Arms race all over again
by gan17 on Tue 27th Dec 2011 17:36 in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

Just when the arms race on desktop computing seems to have plateaued, up comes Android to start one for mobile devices.

I bet we'll be seeing liquid-cooled smartphones by the time Android Jellybean (or whatever it's called) comes out.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by Kroc
by Neolander on Tue 27th Dec 2011 23:29 in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Windows XP is the keyword here. We are talking about running the latest version of a computer's OS. And Windows 7 would run very badly with only 512 MB.

OS bloat existed before mobile devices. The only apparent reason why we start to care now is that in the mobile world, old OS support seemingly sucks bigtime, to the point where one would have to upgrade the whole OS in order to fix a few glitches and exploits here and there. Kind of like if Microsoft forced you to upgrade a WinXP install to Windows 7 in order to fix some random WMF vulnerability.

Edited 2011-12-27 23:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Kroc
by Alfman on Wed 28th Dec 2011 01:19 in reply to "RE: Comment by Kroc"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Neolander,

Ideally, the OS would be designed to be little more than an extremely fast, lightweight & transparent API. Everything else should be an application running on top, including the primary launcher/shell. This way one could always update to the latest secure kernel without also updating the heavy UI components which perform poorly on older hardware.

Unfortunately ms and apple are both extremely guilty of setting a terrible precedent with regards to bundling the UI & kernel.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by Kroc
by phoenix on Thu 29th Dec 2011 07:09 in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

It's not the RAM that matters, it's the ROM size, and how the ROM is partitioned.

Supposedly, there's not enough room in the apps partition for ICS + TouchWiz.

Why there are hard-coded partition sizes in 2010+ is beyond me.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by Kroc
by zima on Sat 31st Dec 2011 01:33 in reply to "Comment by Kroc"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Cripes! It’s madness. I had 512 MB of RAM on my PC a decade ago, it was way more than enough then, and you can still comfortably run the latest Firefox on Windows XP in 512 MB of RAM now.

With throwaway hardware comes throwaway software. It sickens me.

To be fair, most of the past software left much to be desired, too... (we just largely don't remember the trash that ~always flooded the place; most of it was ignored by us even back then, justifiably so)

Plus, the last decade was quite peculiar with PCs, we largely got into "good enough" territory - which absolutely wasn't the case just a short few years earlier, so hardware was also sort of throwaway (and software had issues) / changing a bit too rapidly.

Yes, a decade-old PC can do essentially all that a typical "new" PC does, if some basic care is given to the choice of efficient software. Browsing, music, IM, videophone, videos (last two just at lower, but still fine res), basic document editing - no problem, I know, I keep one such machine around. Even video editing could be not much of an issue, if via a small trick of proxy editing (doing it on low resolution version of footage, at the end exporting changes in full), the only major "sacrifice" being recent games (but 1. most people don't play 2. until recently, most new machines would also struggle)

Something analogous a decade ago, even on merely 5 year old (then) PC, would be much harder. Rewind the clock again ...not even another full decade, just half, and it probably gets into impossible. Those were the times when new usage patterns were exploding, undoubtedly also because the then-new hardware finally allowed them.

Reply Parent Score: 2