Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 2nd Jan 2012 19:12 UTC
GNU, GPL, Open Source Late last year, president Obama signed a law that makes it possible to indefinitely detain terrorist suspects without any form of trial or due process. Peaceful protesters in Occupy movements all over the world have been labelled as terrorists by the authorities. Initiatives like SOPA promote diligent monitoring of communication channels. Thirty years ago, when Richard Stallman launched the GNU project, and during the three decades that followed, his sometimes extreme views and peculiar antics were ridiculed and disregarded as paranoia - but here we are, 2012, and his once paranoid what-ifs have become reality.
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shmerl
Member since:
2010-06-08

No. One simple example in which DRM is not a valid choice for anyone, and can't be justified. Content providers for example might want you to play the media file only through means they want (like in specific player, on specific hardware etc.). But if you paid for it - you should be free to play it the way you want. However DRM will try to force DMCA like laws, trying to ban such activity as "illegal". This is not justified, and DRM is defective by design.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Brendan Member since:
2005-11-16

Hi,

No. One simple example in which DRM is not a valid choice for anyone, and can't be justified. Content providers for example might want you to play the media file only through means they want (like in specific player, on specific hardware etc.). But if you paid for it - you should be free to play it the way you want. However DRM will try to force DMCA like laws, trying to ban such activity as "illegal". This is not justified, and DRM is defective by design.


If you pay a fee to hire a car for 3 days; does that give you the right to drive the car for 2 weeks? Does it give you the right to sell the car? Can you paint it a different colour? You could've chosen not to hire the car at all, or chosen to pay full price and buy a different car of your own (and get the rights to do anything you like with your car); but you didn't, so you only have the right to drive the car for 3 days. If you don't like your own choice then make a different choice.

If you pay a fee to play a media file on one specific device, does that give you the right to play the media file on a different device? Does it give you the right to make copies? Sell the media file to a friend? You could've chosen not to pay the fee (and not to play the file) at all, or chosen to pay full price and buy a media file of your own (and get the rights to do anything you like with your media file); but you didn't, so you only have the right to play the media file on one specific device. If you don't like your own choice then make a different choice.

- Brendan

Edited 2012-01-05 02:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

Defective by design means defective. The flaw of DRM is application of physical concepts to ideas and information. That will always fail.

Reply Parent Score: 3

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

If you pay a fee to play a media file on one specific device, does that give you the right to play the media file on a different device? Does it give you the right to make copies? Sell the media file to a friend? You could've chosen not to pay the fee (and not to play the file) at all, or chosen to pay full price and buy a media file of your own (and get the rights to do anything you like with your media file); but you didn't, so you only have the right to play the media file on one specific device. If you don't like your own choice then make a different choice.

Most of that stuff is friggin' legal in many places.

In my place (and in many others) it is perfectly legal to do a backup copy, copy used by family, or copy for the purpose of using in different format (say, CD->mp3 - but of course also DVD/Bluray -> drive-less laptop or portable player ...oh, yes, I can just ignore & crack DRM which prevents me from exercising what is my legal right)
..you were saying?

And in fact, I can do however many copies / installs of some software I bought as I like - as long as only one is used at a time.
(whoops, there's that pesky DRM again; NVM how it can block public domain, if it worked)

Don't friggin' project your abnormal situation on the rest of the world (oh, and don't force that aberration on us), don't spew your rubbish of media industry PR all over the thread.
Don't pretend, if you & your place are to weak to have made better choices, that others didn't.

Reply Parent Score: 2