Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 6th Jan 2012 17:47 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes Ah yes, why not? The last time we did this, it was March 2011, so it's been almost a year since we offered a little insight into what kind of operating systems and browsers you, dear readers, are using. Nothing particularly earth-shattering going on here.
Thread beginning with comment 502408
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Flash usage
by djrikki on Fri 6th Jan 2012 18:44 UTC
djrikki
Member since:
2011-09-02

Everyone install Adobe's Flash Player 'just in case™'. I cannot see any reason to deliberately uninstall it. Until content providers reduce the amount of content that require Flash the situation will not change anytime soon. If you buy a new computer its at that point you decide what things you should install or you install it when its needed, people never actively decide to uninstall something unless it breaks.

Less focus on alternative operating systems this year I feel?

--
Discover Amiga, Discover AmigaOS
www.amigaos.net

Reply Score: 4

RE: Flash usage
by rayson on Fri 6th Jan 2012 19:06 in reply to "Flash usage"
rayson Member since:
2009-05-21

Everyone install Adobe's Flash Player 'just in case™'. I cannot see any reason to deliberately uninstall it.


On my windows partition, I only enable Flash in IE (mainly for viewing YouTube), and most of the time I use FireFox. On Linux I did not even bother to install Flash, as I have Chrome installed and use VP8 for YouTube playback.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Flash usage
by phoenix on Fri 6th Jan 2012 21:23 in reply to "RE: Flash usage"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

"Everyone install Adobe's Flash Player 'just in case™'. I cannot see any reason to deliberately uninstall it.


On my windows partition, I only enable Flash in IE (mainly for viewing YouTube), and most of the time I use FireFox. On Linux I did not even bother to install Flash, as I have Chrome installed and use VP8 for YouTube playback.
"

Chrome ships with Adobe Flash pre-installed as part of the browser install. Thus, you do have Flash installed. ;) Just check the plugins page in Chrome, and you'll see it listed there. Even on Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Flash usage
by Lennie on Sat 7th Jan 2012 11:06 in reply to "RE: Flash usage"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

The last few weeks YouTube has been pushing out changes and A/B testing* changed to perfect their support for WebM/HTML5 video.

For example, if you enable html5-support for Youtube at: http://youtube.com/html5

And you visit a different site with a YouTube video enabled, it is very much possible it will be displayed in HTML5/WebM.

I've also seen that YouTube has started to enable HTTPS support.

That means that https://youtube.com/ could be the default in the future. This is to protect the login-cookie users use (used by people who upload and comment).

Only the video is downloaded over HTTP from the caching servers (it is a different domain, thus the cookie won't be sent in that case).

Also they are enabling HTTPS so they can enable the use of SPDY.

SPDY is the faster 'HTTP-transport'-method of loading pages from Google as implemented in Chrome and maybe Firefox 10, but probably Firefox 11.

* A/B testing is that certain users temporarily see the new version and other users see the original. This is to test what happends when you enable new code without impacting all users if something does not work.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Flash usage
by Hussein on Mon 9th Jan 2012 15:38 in reply to "RE: Flash usage"
Hussein Member since:
2008-11-22

I view YouTube and other video sites in HTML5 but still have Flash installed just in case. I use ClickToFlash so most of the time I'm not using Flash even though it is installed.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Flash usage
by scarr on Fri 6th Jan 2012 19:35 in reply to "Flash usage"
scarr Member since:
2010-11-07

Having flash installed does hurt. Battery power on a notebook is adversely affected, and pages are slower to load.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Flash usage
by Gusar on Fri 6th Jan 2012 21:27 in reply to "RE: Flash usage"
Gusar Member since:
2010-07-16

That's what FlashBlock is for. I have flash installed because there's still too much content online that requires it, but with FlashBlock it loads only when I want it to load.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE: Flash usage
by lfeagan on Fri 6th Jan 2012 20:22 in reply to "Flash usage"
lfeagan Member since:
2006-04-01

Your comment motivated me to uninstall Flash and see how usable (or crippling) Firefox is without it. Should be interesting. I just looked through the 52 tabs I had open after uninstalling Flash and restarting Firefox and all seem reasonable.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Flash usage
by lfeagan on Sat 7th Jan 2012 02:39 in reply to "RE: Flash usage"
lfeagan Member since:
2006-04-01

My little experiment is meeting with mixed-success. Most techy sites have been reasonably usable. But apparently Taco Bell felt that having Flash on their front page was critical and told me I needed Flash ("This site requires that you have Adobe Flash installed on your computer. Click here to download and install Flash."). Thankfully I didn't really need their site to get the info I wanted.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Flash usage
by mightshade on Sat 7th Jan 2012 03:25 in reply to "Flash usage"
mightshade Member since:
2008-11-20

Everyone install Adobe's Flash Player 'just in case™'.

Everyone? My computer has no Flash installed since about two years. Maybe I'm lucky, but all websites I consider worth visiting work. Embedded youtube videos don't show, but they work when watched on youtube directly, so I can live with that. Who knows, perhaps I even stumble upon a solution to that one day.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Flash usage
by Nico57 on Tue 10th Jan 2012 02:52 in reply to "Flash usage"
Nico57 Member since:
2006-12-18

I use IE8 a lot, and only load Flash on selected white-listed websites (OSnews obviously not being one of them).

That's actually one of the neatest features in IE (second only to InPrivate Filtering): open the Tools menu > Manage Add-ons, select Shockwave Flash Object, click on More information (lower pane), then click on Remove from all sites.
Now every website that wants to run Flash will show a non-intrusive gold bar at the top, and let you choose whether you agree or not.

And then you realize that virtually every web site wants you to run it, even when there's no visible Flash content, and that its primary use is NOT as a multimedia framework, but as yet another user tracking system.

(Disabling local storage in Flash also somewhat limits its usefulness for trackers; but not running it at all if not needed it definitely the best option.)

Edited 2012-01-10 02:53 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1