Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 20th Jan 2012 13:41 UTC
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y "This week, tons of websites are reporting that Apple is catching up with Android when it comes to U.S. smartphone market share. The reports are based on some new data from Nielsen, a metrics company that measures smartphone use. The only problem: people are completely misinterpreting the data." Numbers are fickle beings.
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Sad state of journalism
by porcel on Sat 21st Jan 2012 10:58 UTC
porcel
Member since:
2006-01-28

Here is the relevant part of the article:

Nielsen didn't provide any info explicitly describing the change in overall market share, so I went back and pulled its last set of published numbers, showing U.S. smartphone market share for the third quarter of 2011. In those numbers, Android was at 42.8 percent and Apple was at 28.3 percent of the overall smartphone market. In the new quarter-four numbers, Android is at 46.3 percent while Apple is at 30 percent. Data from ComScore, another independent metrics company, shows a similar scenario.

So did Apple grow in overall smartphone market share from the third to fourth quarter? Sure. But so did Android. And Android grew quite a bit more, gauging by Nielsen's measurements -- twice as much, with a total share increase of 3.5 points compared to Apple's 1.7. Despite the boost in iPhone sales following the launch of the iPhone 4S, the gap between the two platforms has actually continued to widen.

Damn facts. Always getting in the way of a good story.


What surprised me is that I had seen the faulty conclusions quoted in reputable newspapers as fact. Do journalists do any fact-checking any more?

Reply Score: 3

RE: Sad state of journalism
by unclefester on Sat 21st Jan 2012 13:41 in reply to "Sad state of journalism"
unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13


What surprised me is that I had seen the faulty conclusions quoted in reputable newspapers as fact. Do journalists do any fact-checking any more?


No.

Most news stories are now just verbatim reprints of press releases and wire service articles.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Sad state of journalism
by zima on Fri 27th Jan 2012 23:02 in reply to "Sad state of journalism"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

What surprised me is that I had seen the faulty conclusions quoted in reputable newspapers as fact. Do journalists do any fact-checking any more?

The "great state of journalism from the past" is largely a myth, anyway (and ending your question with "any more" itself an expression of myths into which humans fall & propagate, responsible also for so called bad journalism).

In the past, there was hardly any way to reasonably verify stories, much less opportunities to stumble on anything which would cast some doubt on them, so of course the audiences remember them as more "reliable" - and we have the archives, we know how ridiculous many were (too often, say, just a thinly veiled propaganda; seriously, check for yourself: follow for a year some random "reputable newspaper" on the day of each issue plus a century)

Come on, fairly recent past holds a gem called outright "policy by press release" - but how many people still believe in the myths of bomber or missile (or mineshaft...) gaps?
How many are aware of the whole background and real outcomes of, say, even something as profound like Cuban missile crisis?
How many realize about Team B? (some really curious names associated with this one) Nurse Nayirah?

And there's how people tend to remember the past as much better than it was ...maybe it helps us to cope with how better it actually is "now" in most cases of "now" (generally, how we like to believe in the reliability of our very poor memory - for one example in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eyewitness_identification - or, overall, our mind: go through a list of cognitive biases)

Kinda like the text made popular by one Baz Luhrmann single...
Accept certain inalienable truths, prices will rise, politicians will philander, you too will get old, and when you do you’ll fantasize that when you were young prices were reasonable, politicians were noble and children respected their elders.


Edited 2012-01-27 23:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2