Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 1st Feb 2012 22:24 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless How many N9's did Nokia sell, and how many Lumias did Nokia sell? It's an interesting thing to ponder, because estimates by Tomi T. Ahonen seem to indicate that, despite decidedly undermarketing the thing, the N9 faired considerably better in the marketplace than the Lumia did.
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Comment by PieterGen
by PieterGen on Thu 2nd Feb 2012 10:12 UTC
PieterGen
Member since:
2012-01-13

For Nokia it would be wise to have 2 operating systems. In this case WindowsPhone and Meego. Look at Samsung. Android is of course very important for them, but they don't want to have all eggs in one basket. Enter: Tizen and WindowsPhone. Plus, that way they can cater more market segments.

WindowsPhone was a good choice for Nokia. The Android space was already taken by Samsung and others, iOS is of course exclusively Apple, BlackBerry is a sinking ship, which leaves WindowsPhone as the only alternative.

Plus: Windows is still King in the corporate world. If Microsoft manages to make phones & tablets that are sexy and integrate well with their Outlook, Office, Sharepoint etc. than they have a winner. Sysadmins will love it. But Nokia will need either some sort of exclusivity from Microsoft or a special Nokia Look&Feel WindowsPhone, in order to differentiate from the competition. I don't see that happening yet......So that is a setback.

As I said, there a plenty Android phones now. So for a 2nd OS, Meego would be a great choice. Or actually, ANY full Linux OS. Why not partner with Ubuntu? The question would then of course be if Microsoft will let Nokia offer both WindowsPhone devices AND Linux devices ?

Edited 2012-02-02 10:13 UTC

Reply Score: 1

WP7 not corporate
by pgquiles on Thu 2nd Feb 2012 10:40 in reply to "Comment by PieterGen"
pgquiles Member since:
2006-07-16

Windows Phone 7.5 is not corporate-friendly at all. It's a 100% consumer phone operating system.

You cannot even get a full backup of a phone running WP7! For the things you want to back up, you need to use several different tools and services. You cannot backup SMSs, for instance. Corporate nightmare.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Comment by PieterGen
by ricegf on Thu 2nd Feb 2012 11:20 in reply to "Comment by PieterGen"
ricegf Member since:
2007-04-25

I believe that the investment community expected Nokia to add Android to their Qt-centric Symbian / MeeGo portfolio a year ago (given that Android can be adapted to support Qt applications), and the rising stock prices before the Feb 11 announcement indicates a majority consensus that this strategy could have worked.

Imagine a Nokia with Symbian at the low end, Android in the mainstream, and MeeGo at the high end, with their own app store offering a range of apps that run in all 3 environments but with specialty apps that exploit each platform.

The drubbing the stock has taken since indicates the low confidence in the current Windows-centric strategy. The accelerated collapse of Symbian sales and slim Windows sales over the past year confirm the consensus position IMHO.

Time will tell if the strategy is a long-term win, but I'm still very sceptical.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Comment by PieterGen
by taschenorakel on Thu 2nd Feb 2012 11:24 in reply to "RE: Comment by PieterGen"
taschenorakel Member since:
2005-07-06

Imagine a Nokia with Symbian at the low end, Android in the mainstream, and MeeGo at the high end, with their own app store offering a range of apps that run in all 3 environments but with specialty apps that exploit each platform.


Even WP7 as additional revenue stream could have made sense: Hardware and software are fixed, so R&D costs are minimal. You'd only spend a few bucks on design. Microsoft pays the advertisement. Easy drive-by income. You just don't make it your only bet. Also no need to jump on the Android band wagon I'd say.

Reply Parent Score: 2