Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 4th Feb 2012 14:53 UTC, submitted by bowkota
Google "A group of European regulators has written to Google calling on it to halt the introduction of its new privacy policy, saying it needs to investigate whether the proposals sufficiently protect users' personal data." I'd rather regulators are on top of this now than when it's too late and we're all plugged into the Google Hivemind Overlord.
Thread beginning with comment 505904
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Why?
by gan17 on Sat 4th Feb 2012 16:15 UTC in reply to "Why?"
gan17
Member since:
2008-06-03

Dunno about the EU situation, but part of the reason Google's been getting a lot of heat from US legislators is because their "opt-out" options and pages seem very cryptic (to the average user) and sketchy. I think most people want a single "do not mine my data in any way, shape or form" option for them to tick.

At least, that's the impression I'm getting. Maybe it's a similar opinion in the EU.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Why?
by CapEnt on Sat 4th Feb 2012 17:18 in reply to "RE: Why?"
CapEnt Member since:
2005-12-18

Google at least offer a opt-out and bother themselves to explain the changes that they made on their privacy policy.

This is already a way more then a very large amount of big online services does for its users. Indeed, sometimes they do not even notify you about the changes, use a auto opt-in policy, and automatically changes back all you privacy options that you may have made to a default one when a new feature comes out quietly.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Why?
by Redeeman on Sat 4th Feb 2012 17:35 in reply to "RE[2]: Why?"
Redeeman Member since:
2006-03-23

while that is true, just because others are bigger assholes it does not justify wrong doings, even if they are not as bad.

im not saying the new privacy policy is bad or worse, just saying its no excuse that others are worse

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Why?
by jared_wilkes on Sat 4th Feb 2012 20:07 in reply to "RE[2]: Why?"
jared_wilkes Member since:
2011-04-25

The only opt-out being offered is to log out, which I would not characterize as an opt-out.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Why?
by andydread on Sat 4th Feb 2012 22:04 in reply to "RE: Why?"
andydread Member since:
2009-02-02

Dunno about the EU situation, but part of the reason Google's been getting a lot of heat from US legislators is because their "opt-out" options and pages seem very cryptic (to the average user) and sketchy. I think most people want a single "do not mine my data in any way, shape or form" option for them to tick.

At least, that's the impression I'm getting. Maybe it's a similar opinion in the EU.


Lets not forget that Microsoft is the main reason why Google has been catching flack from authorities lately. Microsoft and a group of its partners have been lobbying very hard for Google to be investigated.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Why?
by tomcat on Sat 4th Feb 2012 23:38 in reply to "RE[2]: Why?"
tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

"Dunno about the EU situation, but part of the reason Google's been getting a lot of heat from US legislators is because their "opt-out" options and pages seem very cryptic (to the average user) and sketchy. I think most people want a single "do not mine my data in any way, shape or form" option for them to tick.

At least, that's the impression I'm getting. Maybe it's a similar opinion in the EU.


Lets not forget that Microsoft is the main reason why Google has been catching flack from authorities lately. Microsoft and a group of its partners have been lobbying very hard for Google to be investigated.
"

I'm not sure how that's relevant. Google was lobbying the federal government to investigate Microsoft back in 2000. Now, MS is returning the favor. And apparently, Google learned nothing from the experience -- or thinks they're smarter than regulators.

Reply Parent Score: 2