Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 9th Feb 2012 20:15 UTC
Apple Way back in 2005, only a few months after I joined the OSNews team, I interviewed Wim Schermer, founder and then-owner of the largest chain of Apple "Premium Reseller" stores in The Netherlands, MacSupport (now iCentre). In fact, Wim Schermer was the first Dutchman to buy a Macintosh - the original Macintosh, that is - in The Netherlands, and went on to start his Apple reseller business in 1988. While the interview covered many aspects, one thing always stuck with me: Schermer was concerned about what would happen to his business if Apple were to open an official Apple Store in The Netherlands. Seven years later, his concerns are becoming reality.
Thread beginning with comment 506546
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

"I want to buy at an independent reseller so I can have an open and honest chat about Apple and its products, to make sure I'm going home with the right choice, and not Apple's choice


Tell me you don't really believe that. There is very little difference between an Apple reseller and an official Apple store. They're both there to sell you Apple products. You think that Apple reseller is going to point you at a Dell if he thinks that's best for you? Not bloody likely.
"

An example to illustrate my point.

Went to MacSupport to buy a used iMac. Needed a mouse with it. Sales clerk says: "Do you want an Apple mouse, or a mouse that works?" I told him the latter, and he gave me a third party mouse.

Try getting honest service like that at an Apple Store. Not bloody likely.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

There was one thing I was wondering about at the end of the article.

What would be fair of Apple if they just bought the shops of MacSupport.

If Apple doesn't want their resellers to remain and they need shop space, might as well buy it from them.

Reply Parent Score: 2

MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Apple doesn't just start a store somewhere, they're very careful to pick the best location and have a building they can shape on the inside like they want to. It all has to be perfect.

And I don't think they gave a damn about other Apple stuff selling shops.

Reply Parent Score: 3

kristoph Member since:
2006-01-01

If you go to the Apple store and tell them you want a two or three button button mouse not only will they explain that you can't buy one there but will helpfully provide a list of which mice work best with a Mac (in fact, because Microsoft mice tend to work very well, my local store would send you to the Microsoft store next door).

Maybe it's not like that in the rest of the world but in the US the sales people are happy to help even if you don't wind up buying something from their store.

Now obviously if you go in and you need a PC they will try to convince you a Mac is better but that's why you came to an Apple store in the first place, right?

Reply Parent Score: 4

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

A single data point a generalization/trend makes not.

Plus Apple Stores do sell 3rd party accessories, mice among them.

Reply Parent Score: 2

leos Member since:
2005-09-21

Went to MacSupport to buy a used iMac. Needed a mouse with it. Sales clerk says: "Do you want an Apple mouse, or a mouse that works?" I told him the latter, and he gave me a third party mouse.

Try getting honest service like that at an Apple Store. Not bloody likely.


Honest? Sounds like the guy is pretty biased to me. I actually enjoy the new apple mice, and switched from a regular mouse to an external apple trackpad on the iMac.

I doubt they're pushing their mice that hard. The Apple online store sells lots of mice from other manufacturers alongside their own.

Reply Parent Score: 2

billysmith35 Member since:
2009-06-20

I have 2 examples I recall immediately:

1) My first Mac Book Pro in 2006 or 2007. I wanted to puchase it with the memory maxed out. The sales associate told me to buy the cheaper version and purchase the memory from Crucial. Saved me a bunch.

2) Looking for an external drive. The sales associate asked me if I used or expected to use FireWire. I said no. He told me to go to Best Buy or another location and buy a drive that didn't have FireWire since all of the ones at Apple Store came with FireWire and were more expensive because of it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

dimosd Member since:
2006-02-10

Most people are much more interested in Apple's software than Apple's hardware, because it costs doubles as much and isn't worth it. 30 Euros for Apple's software sounds about right.
Just a thought that came into my mind.

Reply Parent Score: 3

steogede2 Member since:
2007-08-17

My first Mac Book Pro in 2006 or 2007. I wanted to puchase it with the memory maxed out. The sales associate told me to buy the cheaper version and purchase the memory from Crucial. Saved me a bunch.


You're not kidding it saved you a bunch. I remember looking at the prices of Macs with fully spec'd RAM about that sort of time (don't know if it is still the case) - Apple's markup on the RAM was astronomical.

I hope Apple value that sales person and his(?) great customer service. It's that sort of customer service that keeps me coming back. Sure they would have made more money in the short term on the RAM, but I bet you'd have thought twice about buying an Apple again if you found out you had been ripped off.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I personally have never received any helpful advice from anyone at any electronics store.

Maybe that's why they are all dying off.

http://it.slashdot.org/story/12/02/09/2320247/the-gradual-death-of-...

Reply Parent Score: 3

acobar Member since:
2005-11-15

Well, I got, but it was a long ago.

Some 17+ years ago the Internet was not what it is today: it lacked good specs and pictures about what you would need. Computer Shopper, Byte and other magazines were still strong and offered that. Fast forward, all information and pics needed to make a choice are at a mouse click distance. And that is all you need for computers and its peripherals because we all already know what will be the "user experience" associated to this kind of product or can read all about the differences of the new releases. And it is a kind of product we may very well wait a couple of days to have our hands on. Extend what was said to books.

Cell phones may follow this path once some three or so main systems totally dominate the market. We still want to handle them but I bet that as we become more familiar with the sizes as they stabilize, it will be less required as time goes. The difference here is that they are cheap (or will be) and we are always in a hurry to get them.

That is not what happens with clothes, shoes and cars, at least by now. The "user experience" still can not be satisfactorily presented by just reading and mouse clicks. We still need to wear or drive to have a glimpse of what will be to have them.

So, yes, computer/electronics department stores are expensive and will probably sink.

I hope that general department stores may somehow survive and keep even a small space for computers/electronics but looking at how fast the last changes and the small margins associated, I have some doubts about the value of that "small space" for the store.

Reply Parent Score: 2

polaris20 Member since:
2005-07-06

You're still asking a salesman a question about something you want to purchase, which is your first mistake, especially in this day and age. How do you know the Apple reseller doesn't really think the Apple mouse is better, but makes a spiff on the off brand mouse?

Example: when I worked at a camera shop while I was going to college, we were told that despite Nikon lenses being of higher quality than Sigma lenses we should sell the Sigma lenses. Why? Because we made an extra $10 per sale, in our pocket.

Bottom line is it's 2012: do your 20 minutes Internet research and buy what really is the best product. Don't rely upon a salesman's opinion, be it reseller or Apple.

Reply Parent Score: 2