Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 10th Feb 2012 00:09 UTC, submitted by moondevil
Windows As you all know, Windows 8 will be the first release of Windows NT which supports the ARM architecture. Microsoft hasn't been particularly forthcoming about this new Windows variant, but that's changing today. The company has posted a long and in-depth blog post about Windows 8 on ARM.
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I get it, kinda
by joshv on Fri 10th Feb 2012 14:35 UTC
joshv
Member since:
2006-03-18

So I get that the issue with the old Windows API stack is that if you allow unrestricted installation of even ARM compiled "desktop" binaries, eventually something is going to be installed that doesn't work well with power management, runs processes in the background that don't place nice, or runs stuff in the foreground that eats your battery alive.

WinRT is carefully crafted to make it very very hard to do any of these things. Whereas the older windows APIs allow just about anything - this is why MS had to carefully port Office to WOA, to make sure that these desktop apps behaved properly on more limited devices.

That being said, couldn't MS provide an updated subset of the older windows APIs? This would be a cleaned up API that allows for easy porting, but forces app designers to make sure that their desktop apps are touch friendly, don't require admin privileges to install or run, have portable installations, and play nice with power management.

Reply Score: 2

RE: I get it, kinda
by moondevil on Fri 10th Feb 2012 16:16 in reply to "I get it, kinda"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

That being said, couldn't MS provide an updated subset of the older windows APIs? This would be a cleaned up API that allows for easy porting, but forces app designers to make sure that their desktop apps are touch friendly, don't require admin privileges to install or run, have portable installations, and play nice with power management.


WinRT is already possible to use from the desktop side, although the set of available APIs is limited.

I guess it is a question of resources, as even for Microsoft it would be too hard to fully provide a complete Win32 replacement in Windows 8.

In the future there might be more WinRT integration in the desktop side, but this is just a guess on my side.

Reply Parent Score: 2