Linked by David Adams on Tue 14th Feb 2012 17:24 UTC
Apple Today Samsung AV product lead Chris Moseley had comments about Apple's rumored entrance into the television marketplace that sound eerily similar to that which Palm CEO Ed Colligan's said a few years back about how Apple's ability to simply walk into this market and figure it out like they had managed to do after years of research.
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David
Member since:
1997-10-01

I think I'm not totally susceptible to Apple fanboyism, and I'm not sure that Apple would be successful in the TV biz, but this:

"TVs are ultimately about picture quality."

is just laughably naive . TVs are only about picture quality (and they're not) only because the other features of every TV on the market are all uniformly lousy. Someone has a chance to dramatically improve the TV watching experience, and if someone's going to do it, I'd put my money on Apple.

Really the only question about whether Apple would be successful it this: Are they going to follow their iPhone/iPad pricing model (the same or cheaper than anyone else), or the Mac pricing model (ranging from a little more expensive to wildly more expensive). If an Apple TV costs the same as a comparable TV from Samsung, then Samsung is in trouble.

Reply Score: 3

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

I agree that this sentence is wrong, but I would rather say TVs are about picture quality AND having lots of future-proof video inputs.

As has been seen many times in the past, it's best to separate concerns in electronic devices which are supposed to last. In this scheme, TVs are about displaying video input and "standard" broadcasts, but the rest is best left to specialized and most of all replaceable external devices.

How many people have bought these expensive TV sets with an integrated VCR recorder only to discover that DVD was the new king a few years after ?

In my opinion, TV manufacturers should focus on making it easier to plug peripherals in. Like, easing the switch between them, automatically detecting when a new device is plugged in, letting users give a name to each...

Edited 2012-02-14 18:54 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

David Member since:
1997-10-01

I agree with you. I think what the TV market needs for "future proofness" might be to have a general-purpose computer built in and a relatively open "app store" model that allows 3rd party developers to provide various services and customizations of the user experience. Unfortunately, broadcast TV is still going to be king, so unless Apple can work out some kind of partnership with, for example, a satellite provider to provide the raw feed of broadcast TV, in much the same way that they "dumb piped" AT&T with the iPhone, then their TV strategy is going nowhere.

But it would be cool if they could figure out a way to replace the interchangable set-top box model of today with a software-based ecosystem.

Reply Parent Score: 1

malxau Member since:
2005-12-04

I agree that this sentence is wrong, but I would rather say TVs are about picture quality AND having lots of future-proof video inputs.


We'll have to wait and see, but I'd expect Apple to deliver a highly integrated and simple product that drives users into its content at every opportunity. External inputs are a negative for Apple.

How many people have bought these expensive TV sets with an integrated VCR recorder only to discover that DVD was the new king a few years after ?


IMO that's the challenge Apple has to overcome. Historically they sell devices that are replaced every couple of years. Either they can make TVs disposable, or they need to compete in a market where long term support matters, and Apple haven't done well with that in the past. Fortunately a network-based device won't need to be thrown away due to changes in removable media formats.

Reply Parent Score: 2

clasqm Member since:
2010-09-23

The future of "TV" is about having exactly ONE future-proof input.

Wi-Fi.

If Apple builds a "TV", expect all those inputs at the back of the box to be gone. there will be a power jack (unless that goes inductive). Apple is about reducing holes in the box, not multiplying them.

Reply Parent Score: 2

0brad0 Member since:
2007-05-05


Really the only question about whether Apple would be successful it this: Are they going to follow their iPhone/iPad pricing model (the same or cheaper than anyone else), or the Mac pricing model (ranging from a little more expensive to wildly more expensive). If an Apple TV costs the same as a comparable TV from Samsung, then Samsung is in trouble.


As long as Apple tries to shove locked down walled garden crap which is locked down to iTunes and needs to be rooted to be usable... no thanks Apple.

Reply Parent Score: 1

David Member since:
1997-10-01

Oh, you can guarantee that would be the case.

On the other hand, what other TV has an open platform?

Reply Parent Score: 1

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

It depends, IF Apple has a new Steve Jobs which says YES and NO at the right time. Then sure they can get a large marketshare in a new market.

I didn't perticularly like him or anything, but he strong views about what he wanted to see and what he liked and disliked.

I have to admit I've not had a close look at what Apple has been doing lately. Siri is their biggest thing ? Which might still be something Steve was involved in.

So far I've not seen anything new, but they still have time.

Reply Parent Score: 2