Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 15th Feb 2012 23:36 UTC
Google Forget patent trolling - Android's biggest weakness, and most daunting obstacle to overcome, is its complete and utter lack of updates. Motorola has detailed its upgrade plans for Ice Cream Sandwich - and it ain't good. If the company Google just bought can't even update its phones properly, what can we expect from the rest?
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RE: ICS is a big change...
by kaiwai on Thu 16th Feb 2012 06:02 UTC in reply to "ICS is a big change..."
kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

For what it's worth, the jump from Gingerbread to ICS is a big change. Big api changes, big changes in the kernel with how the cameras and gpu & graphics stack work. Big changes in the the settings apps, the notification bar, etc.

The CM/AOSP folks are having a heck of a time getting devices brought up to snuff driver wise, and a lot of the extra features, functionality and tweaks they developed for GB have to be forward ported one by one. And their changes are pretty light weight.

The manufacturer's and carriers? Well, their problem is even larger. All the extra skinning, tweaks, extra apps, etc., all have to be either ported or heavily tested to make sure they work right under ICS.

Even Asus, who had the gold metal of Honeycomb updates for the original Transformer is having a hard time getting an ICS release fully stabilized and released.

I'm not saying that things couldn't be better run, they certainly can. But in this particular case, the level of change from GB to ICS is a big leap compared to previous upgrade iterations (Donut to Eclair, Eclair to Froyo, Froyo to Gingerbread) and additional time should be expected...


I'm going out on a limb here for a second but how about not include all that additional crap that isn't required; ICS is perfectly fine out of the box and doesn't require additional tweaking - port the drivers, compile the damn thing and provide it to end users via an internet enable win32 front end that bypasses carriers altogether.

Quite frankly it is the same crappy excuse that Samsung used to justify not bringing ICS to Samsung Galaxy S (apparently it doesn't have enough ROM space on the device) - could they provide a vanilla version of ICS for Galaxy without TouchWiz? sure they could but god forbid the end user seeing a phone without all their crapware preloaded onto it!

Sorry but once again we have phone companies selling their phones cheaper than Apple only to find that they don't have the resources at the other end of the equation, namely customer support, to adequately develop and support Android when future updates and upgrades arrive.

There is a reason why I advocate Windows Phone 7 and iPhone's but I guess people on this forum (I'm not directing this observation at you btw) will never learn in favour of believing that being an Android fanboy is 'sticking to the man'.

Edited 2012-02-16 06:22 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: ICS is a big change...
by _txf_ on Thu 16th Feb 2012 08:48 in reply to "RE: ICS is a big change..."
_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17

There is a reason why I advocate Windows Phone 7 and iPhone's but I guess people on this forum (I'm not directing this observation at you btw) will never learn in favour of believing that being an Android fanboy is 'sticking to the man'.


To me as an engineer, it isn't about sticking to the man. It is about being interested in the device I use. WP7 and iOS are appliances, Android is what I consider to be an real operating system (guts exposed).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: ICS is a big change...
by kaiwai on Thu 16th Feb 2012 09:01 in reply to "RE[2]: ICS is a big change..."
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

To me as an engineer, it isn't about sticking to the man. It is about being interested in the device I use. WP7 and iOS are appliances, Android is what I consider to be an real operating system (guts exposed).


If they were selling the Galaxy S II for $50 unlocked bootloader, unlocked sim and unsubsidised then I'd be happy for their position of, "screw you, you're on your own" but the reality is that the SII costs in NZ$999 so as a result I expect at least 3 years worth of operating system updates as part of the large sum of money that was handed over initially.

As for the following:

Android is what I consider to be an real operating system (guts exposed).


What a load of crap - call me back when I can download and compile a bog standard vanilla Android source code (kernel and user land) and load it onto a phone without having to jump through a dozen fiery hoops because of locked bootloaders and the vendor refusing to provide the source code to their drivers. "Guts exposed" is a load of crap - if they were exposed I'd be able to do the former without having to hack the living crap out of the source code just to get the thing working on my phone.

Edit: Sorry if I sounded like a bit of a rude prick in the post.

Edited 2012-02-16 09:03 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: ICS is a big change...
by r_a_trip on Thu 16th Feb 2012 11:07 in reply to "RE: ICS is a big change..."
r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

There is a reason why I advocate Windows Phone 7 and iPhone's but I guess people on this forum [snip] will never learn in favour of believing that being an Android fanboy is 'sticking to the man'.

Wrong assumption. Why is using Android "sticking it to the man"? Google is "the man". Most techies using Android are choosing to use a phone that:

A.) Isn't locked out the wazoo.
B.) Works well with alternative systems.

Windows Phone 7? I might be wrong, but my guess it being an MS phone, it ties in heavily with Windows. I don't use Windows and I'm not planning to.

iPhone? I've experienced the activation process and it ties into iTunes. Which either requires Windows or Mac OS X. I have neither. So seems to be a no go too.

Reply Parent Score: 4