Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 22nd Feb 2012 15:24 UTC, submitted by Ajeet
Multimedia, AV On my mark... Get set... Start not caring! Adobe has announced it plans to discontinue the stand-alone Flash Player for Linux, instead focussing all its effort on the version available through the Pepper API - which, besides Chrome, no one else is going to support.
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It's been a long time coming
by Morgan on Wed 22nd Feb 2012 15:38 UTC
Morgan
Member since:
2005-06-29

Overall this makes me happy. I find it funny though, that just as Flash on 64-bit GNU/Linux has become usable, the entire standalone Flash product is being phased out for that OS.

And to (hopefully) forestall any conspiracy theories about how Adobe is trying to force GNU/Linux into obsolescence, please pay attention to the entire article. Specifically, the part where this is Adobe's first step in doing away with Flash altogether. It makes sense for them to stop updates for the major OS with the least number of installs (don't forget that a lot of GNU/Linux users don't want or care for Flash either because it's closed source or because they prefer WebM/HTML5 to begin with).

Also, your current installation of Flash won't magically stop working. You just won't get any more feature updates once this is in effect. Yet another reason to move away from a platform already plagued with security holes and bad performance.

I'm pretty sure the Mac version will be next, not only because of Apple's stand on Flash (if they are indeed carrying Jobs' attitude post mortem) but because it is still a smaller install base than Windows. Speaking of Windows, I wonder if Flash on that platform will end with the release of Windows 8? Especially given that Microsoft is targeting ARM as a second platform and Adobe has already discontinued Flash for ARM devices.

Reply Score: 10

RE: It's been a long time coming
by gan17 on Wed 22nd Feb 2012 15:50 in reply to "It's been a long time coming"
gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

I don't have flashplugin on any of my systems, so it's non-news to me.

But I do worry for those less savvy users (say the nice lady who had her grandson install Ubuntu + everything under the sun for her) who currently have it installed, though. Sure, it'll keep working for them after Adobe drops support for it, but what about the security aspect?

Hopefully their package management systems will automatically remove/replace Adobe's flashplugin for them in due time.

Edited 2012-02-22 15:50 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Yet another reason to move away from a platform already plagued with security holes and bad performance.

But... but... What about porn, illegal streaming, and 90% of the games running on Linux ? ;)

Edited 2012-02-22 16:22 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

rafaelnp Member since:
2009-06-03

Install a windows vm and be happy B)

Reply Parent Score: 1

TemporalBeing Member since:
2007-08-22

Also, your current installation of Flash won't magically stop working. You just won't get any more feature updates once this is in effect. Yet another reason to move away from a platform already plagued with security holes and bad performance.


I wouldn't really mind except for the fact that a lot of websites that do use flash are setup to always push you to the newest version, which if you don't have it installed they then won't work.

That's true regardless of platform.

If Adobe fixed that first (by making the stand-alone Flash on all platforms) ignore the directive (or return a value that will always work) then there will be no issues period.

Until then, if you are stuck on an old version you are more or less SOL for using it.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Browser Insider Member since:
2009-06-16

Free software developers will come up with a solution:

- A common interface between web browsers, the Pepper API and the Flash player.
- Work for good on an alternative to the closed-source now-discontinued Flash player (swfdec, Gnash, etc.)

Too many people need to read Flash content (Flash menus web sites, online videos, online presentations, online chat and telephone, etc.) and sometimes you badly need it and can't wait (e.g. in a corporate environment).

Reply Parent Score: 1