Linked by David Adams on Fri 2nd Mar 2012 15:55 UTC, submitted by sawboss
Windows By all early reports, Windows 8 is going to be a good operating system. Microsoft's hegemony may be crumbling in a mobile computing onslaught, but its core empire remains undimmed. However, whereas Windows 7 had three versions, Windows 8 will apparently be ballooning to 9 versions.
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RE: Dun' matter.
by Kroc on Fri 2nd Mar 2012 16:10 UTC in reply to "Dun' matter."
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

It does matter when they arbitrarily remove and cripple the OS solely for the purpose of differentiating the versions. What physical limitation is there about Starter edition that makes it impossible to change the wallpaper, and that the SHA1 of the default wallpaper is encoded into shell32.dll so that you can’t swap the default wallpaper file?

Also, Lion comes with full disk encryption now. Do home users not need this feature? What kind of excuse do Microsoft have for that?

Reply Parent Score: 18

v RE[2]: Dun' matter.
by Hiev on Fri 2nd Mar 2012 16:12 in reply to "RE: Dun' matter."
RE[2]: Dun' matter.
by Thom_Holwerda on Fri 2nd Mar 2012 16:18 in reply to "RE: Dun' matter."
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Apple is a hardware company.

Microsoft is a software company.

Everything else follows from that.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Dun' matter.
by randy7376 on Sat 3rd Mar 2012 01:42 in reply to "RE[2]: Dun' matter."
randy7376 Member since:
2005-08-08

Apple is a hardware company.

Microsoft is a software company.

Everything else follows from that.


Microsoft is a marketing company first and a software company second.

Reply Parent Score: 9

RE[2]: Dun' matter.
by sukru on Fri 2nd Mar 2012 16:24 in reply to "RE: Dun' matter."
sukru Member since:
2006-11-19

It is basic economics. If people are willing to pay more for your product, you should enable them to do so.

By segmenting the features (like restricting Media Center to higher editions), they enable customers to pay more for more features.

It's like going to a theme park (like Universal Studios), and paying more for front of line passes. The park will still do the same thing every day (i.e.: the cost is fixed), but some will pay more, some less. And they also provide cheaper options (coupons), so that who are not able to afford will still be locked in to the product (starter edition).

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Dun' matter.
by cmost on Sun 4th Mar 2012 11:11 in reply to "RE[2]: Dun' matter."
cmost Member since:
2006-07-16

I would agree with you, however, you're forgetting something important. People aren't simply paying more for the features they want with higher Windows versions. That would only be true if Microsoft sold a single base version of Windows and then provided supplemental add-on packs with additional features. Instead, by fragmenting Windows, Microsoft forces users to pay for a perfectly good license of a crippled version of Windows (read Windows Starter Edition) then they have to pay AGAIN to upgrade that to a functional version of Windows. In the future, if they find they need Domain or other corporate features,then they have to pay for ANOTHER license for a still higher edition of Windows. Microsoft is double and triple dipping and laughing all the way to the bank. And users are too ignorant of what's really going on to be outraged.

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[2]: Dun' matter.
by Jack Burton on Fri 2nd Mar 2012 17:55 in reply to "RE: Dun' matter."
Jack Burton Member since:
2005-07-06

It does matter when they arbitrarily remove and cripple the OS solely for the purpose of differentiating the versions. What physical limitation is there about Starter edition that makes it impossible to change the wallpaper, and that the SHA1 of the default wallpaper is encoded into shell32.dll so that you can’t swap the default wallpaper file?



It's a pretty standard business practice. IBM started doing this eons ago with server hardware.
SAN vendors do this regularily (want more features from your iron? Pay more bucks and they'll unlock the feature).
When you buy a QLogic Fibre Channel switch you have 16 physical ports, but only some are enabled, depending on how much you paid. Want more ports ? Pay a bit more.
They intentionally cripple the features solely for the purpose of differentiating the price.
For hardware it sounds even more weird than for software, but it works like this.

Reply Parent Score: 0

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Truecrypt is free; and beats the shit out of what the premium windows versions ship with.

Reply Parent Score: 6

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Technically this is true, and for people like me and you it works fine once set up properly.

For the average user, it can be a nightmare. I recently recommended it to my dad when he asked about full disk encryption (he's a member of the tinfoil hat brigade, sadly). He is more adept than the average user, for example his laptop has two hard drive bays and he uses Norton Ghost to maintain a redundant backup scheme. However, Truecrypt was simply over his head. He now plans to upgrade from XP to Win7 Ultimate for BitLocker; he's been looking for that last killer feature to push him to 7 and that was it.

Simple, transparent one-step disk encryption as offered by Microsoft, Ubuntu* and Mac OS X exists for people that don't want to fiddle with learning something like Truecrypt, simple as that Free software may seem to me and you.


*I know Ubuntu only encrypts the Home folder by default, but you can use the Alternate install disc to enable full disk encryption.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Dun' matter.
by lucas_maximus on Sat 3rd Mar 2012 16:45 in reply to "RE: Dun' matter."
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

It does matter when they arbitrarily remove and cripple the OS solely for the purpose of differentiating the versions. What physical limitation is there about Starter edition that makes it impossible to change the wallpaper, and that the SHA1 of the default wallpaper is encoded into shell32.dll so that you can’t swap the default wallpaper file?

Also, Lion comes with full disk encryption now. Do home users not need this feature? What kind of excuse do Microsoft have for that?


Dude it is their software, they can choose to price release it however they want.

Don't like it ... don't buy it.

Edited 2012-03-03 16:49 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: Dun' matter.
by mattymoo on Sun 4th Mar 2012 23:00 in reply to "RE: Dun' matter."
mattymoo Member since:
2011-12-29

How come nobody gets all angsty and accuses BMW of arbitrarily crippling the base models of their cars? It is a perfectly valid business decision to provide different levels of value-addition for a price premium.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: Dun' matter.
by zlynx on Tue 6th Mar 2012 20:55 in reply to "RE[2]: Dun' matter."
zlynx Member since:
2005-07-20

It is a little bit different because with a cheaper car it was originally built to a limited specification.

If BMW shipped a cheaper model car and called it a 6 cylinder engine, but it was really an 8 cylinder engine with two filled with concrete, I think people would be equally outraged.

If BMW shipped cheaper cars that were limited only by the engine computer, and you had to pay more in order to exceed 70 mph, people would also be angry.

Reply Parent Score: 2