Linked by David Adams on Mon 5th Mar 2012 21:26 UTC
In the News I ran across a business news story about Yahoo's impending layoffs today, and if you're a deep-into-the-internet person like me, it certainly comes as no surprise to read yet again that Yahoo is on the skids. In fact, you're more likely to be surprised to learn that Yahoo has more than 14,000 employees and made something like $6 billion in revenue last year. Yahoo ceased to be relevant a long time ago, and even the Yahoo services that still get some love, like Flickr, seem to be tainted by association. But the question I asked myself when I read the article was, "why didn't Yahoo become a technology leader?"
Thread beginning with comment 509620
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
didnt adapt
by Adurbe on Mon 5th Mar 2012 22:37 UTC
Adurbe
Member since:
2005-07-06

Yahoo had Years to cope with Google's rise, but rather than emulate it or try something new itself it stuck to its guns. Eventually this will fail in the fast moving tech market. It did this with each product in turn on its own merits. Search, mail and now news.

I dont remember the last time I used a yahoo product to be honest...

Reply Score: 4

RE: didnt adapt
by Elv13 on Tue 6th Mar 2012 02:57 in reply to "didnt adapt"
Elv13 Member since:
2006-06-12

Geocities?

Edited 2012-03-06 02:57 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: didnt adapt
by Adurbe on Tue 6th Mar 2012 14:31 in reply to "RE: didnt adapt"
Adurbe Member since:
2005-07-06

Geocities?


im not sure what you are trying to say?
Another example of them failing to capitalise on MILLIONS of users?

If you mean if I used Geocities, then basically no. My memory of the service is a load of sites, badly designed and with little/no accurate content. If Yahoo had a system where the information was verified by other users it could have been a mini internet in its own right returned by their own search engine. Could have been the way people settled all arguments before wikipedia :-p

Reply Parent Score: 2