Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 7th Mar 2012 22:59 UTC
Apple And it was that time of the year again - Apple held one of its product announcements. This one focussed on the iPad mostly, and while some will call it a disappointment merely because virtually everything had already been leaked, I'm still in awe over the fact the newly announced iPad has a 2048x1536 display. My mind is blown.
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RE[3]: Still Crippled.
by WorknMan on Thu 8th Mar 2012 05:26 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Still Crippled."
WorknMan
Member since:
2005-11-13

Why do I have to use an external iTunes to download and then copy over the podcast when the device is capable of getting it and storing it all within itself. Is the iPad a computer or not?


Sorry, I misunderstood you. If you want to listen to podcasts on your iPad, there are several podcasts apps available on the iPad that will download the podcasts straight to your device. You don't need to use a 'traditional' PC for that.

If it is a "real" computer (and having the complete iLife suite seems to imply it is) then why do I need yet another computer to make it work?


Well, this is not a 'real' computer in the traditional sense. It does not replace a 'traditional' PC anymore than a bicycle replaces a car (although it CAN for some people. That's not what it is designed for.

That being said, you don't NEED a computer to use this. The only time I've had to interface with my PC is for file transfers. If you want to get a file from a PC to a tablet, you're obviously going to need a PC, unless you use Dropbox or something. As for app syncing and stuff, you can do all that in the cloud if you want.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Still Crippled.
by bornagainenguin on Thu 8th Mar 2012 16:41 in reply to "RE[3]: Still Crippled."
bornagainenguin Member since:
2005-08-07

WorknMan posted...

Sorry, I misunderstood you.


It's alright--my fault entirely. I noticed when I got back to the post that I'd skipped a word and it made the rest of the post come out wonky.

WorknMan posted...
If you want to listen to podcasts on your iPad, there are several podcasts apps available on the iPad that will download the podcasts straight to your device. You don't need to use a 'traditional' PC for that.


Well there are video podcasts too, so not everything is intended to be listened to. The point is there is an iTunes included with the device, why can it not do its most basic function and get my shows?

Telling me to use a workaround (yes, telling me to use other apps to duplicate the missing features qualifies as a workaround in my opinion) doesn't help--it breaks the whole Apple experience where things are supposed to just work. Worse it leaves me with a worthless app taking up space that cannot be removed from the system!

Never mind that as with all workarounds, Apple can break the functionality of those apps willy-nilly at any time.

WorknMan posted...
If it is a "real" computer (and having the complete iLife suite seems to imply it is) then why do I need yet another computer to make it work?

Well, this is not a 'real' computer in the traditional sense. It does not replace a 'traditional' PC anymore than a bicycle replaces a car (although it CAN for some people. That's not what it is designed for.


Tell that to people like my father in his late fifties, who considers the iPad to be his Personal Computer. Tell that to whomever it was that wrote Tim Cook's speech littered with references to the post-PC era. And really, in the analogy you chose, this is more akin to trying to replace a car with a motorcycle that has had the engine disabled. You get the appearance of something fast and with advantages that a car does not have--only it has been artificially prevented from being true competition to the car.

WorknMan posted...
That being said, you don't NEED a computer to use this. The only time I've had to interface with my PC is for file transfers. If you want to get a file from a PC to a tablet, you're obviously going to need a PC, unless you use Dropbox or something. As for app syncing and stuff, you can do all that in the cloud if you want.


App syncing has improved tremendously. I really like the ability to do operating system upgrades directly on the device. These are improvements I'm happy to see Apple making, I just don't think they go far enough to liberate the iPad from the PC.

WorknMan posted...
Awesome! Now tell me how do you add your podcasts to the iPad without connecting it to another computer, using only the software that came with it from Apple?

http://lifehacker.com/5855050/the-best-podcast-manager-for-iphone

That also works for iPad. Do you want to disqualify it just because it doesn't come from Apple?


When it comes to basic functionality from a company that prides itself on its "offering the whole widget" approach to computing? You're damn right I do.

This is not about the large numbers of apps in the Apple App Store--this is about basic functionality and an inability to abandon 90s era paradigms that no longer make sense. (Or if I wanted to be spiteful, I'd say this is about Apple guarding their lucrative laptop market and protecting it from being eaten away by the iPad...but I'd like to think the company a little more forward thinking than that...)

--bornagainpenguin

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Still Crippled.
by Neolander on Thu 8th Mar 2012 17:36 in reply to "RE[4]: Still Crippled."
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

"Well, this is not a 'real' computer in the traditional sense. It does not replace a 'traditional' PC anymore than a bicycle replaces a car (although it CAN for some people. That's not what it is designed for."

Tell that to people like my father in his late fifties, who considers the iPad to be his Personal Computer. Tell that to whomever it was that wrote Tim Cook's speech littered with references to the post-PC era. And really, in the analogy you chose, this is more akin to trying to replace a car with a motorcycle that has had the engine disabled. You get the appearance of something fast and with advantages that a car does not have--only it has been artificially prevented from being true competition to the car.

Gotta remember that analogy for later use. It's brilliant ! ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Still Crippled.
by WorknMan on Thu 8th Mar 2012 23:30 in reply to "RE[4]: Still Crippled."
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Well there are video podcasts too, so not everything is intended to be listened to. The point is there is an iTunes included with the device, why can it not do its most basic function and get my shows?

Telling me to use a workaround (yes, telling me to use other apps to duplicate the missing features qualifies as a workaround in my opinion) doesn't help--it breaks the whole Apple experience where things are supposed to just work. Worse it leaves me with a worthless app taking up space that cannot be removed from the system!


Well, if a lack of a podcatcher out of the box is a deal-breaker for you, and you refuse to use a 3rd party app, hard to argue with that, as that is your personal preference. I'm not convinced that this is 'basic functionality' though, since Android doesn't come with a podcatcher built in, and neither does Windows. I doubt WebOS does either, and Linux would probably depend on the distro. I wouldn't expect iTunes on a tablet to be on par feature-wise with the desktop counterpart, as tablet apps are usually 'light' versions of their desktop brethren. As an example, Chrome on Android does not have all of the features that the desktop version does. Again, these devices are not PCs, so stop treating them as such. If you're waiting for tablets to be on par feature-wise with PCs, you're going to be waiting awhile.

Tell that to people like my father in his late fifties, who considers the iPad to be his Personal Computer.


As I said before, tablets are not designed to be PC replacements, but they CAN be for some people. I know somebody who sold her laptop when she got an iPad, because the iPad did everything she needed. And what exactly is wrong with that? If you don't NEED a PC, why should you have one?

Tell that to whomever it was that wrote Tim Cook's speech littered with references to the post-PC era.


You need to go back and listen to Tim's speech again. He made it very clear that the 'post PC era' does NOT mean and end to PCs, but only that the PC is no longer the center of the universe, which, based on the number of people I see living on their smartphones and tablets, is true.

And really, in the analogy you chose, this is more akin to trying to replace a car with a motorcycle that has had the engine disabled. You get the appearance of something fast and with advantages that a car does not have--only it has been artificially prevented from being true competition to the car.


You make it out like people are saying that tablets are somehow superior, or replacements to PCs, but nothing could be further from the truth. They're just easier to use, and more convenient to use at times. As I stated above, they CAN be replacements in certain (limited) situations, but I myself have two PCs, and I still have a tablet, because it does things well that PCs don't. For example, I was lying in bed last night watching Youtube vids. Tablets are good for that. PCs? Not so much. If I'm going to the crapper, I'd rather bring a tablet with me instead of trying to balance a laptop on my lap ;)

Reply Parent Score: 4