Linked by David Adams on Tue 6th Mar 2012 16:23 UTC
Legal If you run a web site or service that runs afoul of US law, and that site is hosted overseas, then the US legal system doesn't have much recourse, right? Wrong. Because the .com, .net, and .org top level domains are managed by a US company, the government can come to Verisign with a court order and seize your domain, effectively shutting you down. And because of a quirk of internet history that made the US-controlled domains the de-facto standard for web sites, this is a situation that's quite possibly permanent.
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RE: Why is this wrong?
by tristan on Thu 8th Mar 2012 12:02 UTC in reply to "Why is this wrong?"
tristan
Member since:
2006-02-01

The US funded everything that became the internet.


I assume you posted this via OSNews's Usenet interface.

It turns out there's quite a popular service on the internet nowadays called the "World Wide Web". It was invented by an Englishman, working in Geneva for the European nuclear research agency.

You should give it a try some time, there's some quite good stuff on there.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Why is this wrong?
by tidux on Fri 9th Mar 2012 20:09 in reply to "RE: Why is this wrong?"
tidux Member since:
2011-08-13

Bah, stealing and/or taking credit for Europe's greatest stuff is practically a sport over here. Einstein? Yoink, worked at Princeton. Werner Von Braun? Yoink, helped start our space program. Timothy Berners Lee? Yoink, now an Ars Technica guy and member of the Cato Institute. Internetworking in general? Yoink.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Why is this wrong?
by ilovebeer on Sat 10th Mar 2012 21:26 in reply to "RE[2]: Why is this wrong?"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

Bah, stealing and/or taking credit for Europe's greatest stuff is practically a sport over here. Einstein? Yoink, worked at Princeton. Werner Von Braun? Yoink, helped start our space program. Timothy Berners Lee? Yoink, now an Ars Technica guy and member of the Cato Institute. Internetworking in general? Yoink.

Since your post doesn't actually contain a valid point, what exactly are you claiming the US stole or is wrongfully taking credit for?

Reply Parent Score: 2