Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 7th Mar 2012 22:59 UTC
Apple And it was that time of the year again - Apple held one of its product announcements. This one focussed on the iPad mostly, and while some will call it a disappointment merely because virtually everything had already been leaked, I'm still in awe over the fact the newly announced iPad has a 2048x1536 display. My mind is blown.
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RE[5]: Not interesting
by nefer on Thu 8th Mar 2012 22:33 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Not interesting"
nefer
Member since:
2012-02-15

Having the ability to manage your files yourself is vital for people who use the iPad as a creative tool.


Traditional file managers are inherently flawed with todays data volumes. They're so broken beyond repair its not even funny. It was fine up until we had disks which were measured in megabytes. It crossed the line of manageability when we had disks with more than a gigabyte of space. Do you know ANY system around you that don't have junk hierarchical file structures of somesort with accumulated cruft that nobody has bothered to check in ages because they don't know what resides in them and they don't really care to weed them out to begin with? Do you use the file manager to retrieve date from them? For both questions, the answer will be almost always no.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Not interesting
by gan17 on Thu 8th Mar 2012 22:41 in reply to "RE[5]: Not interesting"
gan17 Member since:
2008-06-03

That still doesn't mean squat to someone who wants to sort his files his bloody way.

You can spend millions in R&D creating a foolproof filesystem that thinks it does an optimal job, but at the end of the day people who create stuff will still want to sort their work the best way they see fit.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: Not interesting
by marcus0263 on Sun 11th Mar 2012 14:59 in reply to "RE[6]: Not interesting"
marcus0263 Member since:
2007-06-02

That still doesn't mean squat to someone who wants to sort his files his bloody way.

You can spend millions in R&D creating a foolproof filesystem that thinks it does an optimal job, but at the end of the day people who create stuff will still want to sort their work the best way they see fit.


Exactly, one of the many things I dislike about Apple. The attitude of you're doing it wrong if you're not doing it the Apple way.

As I've said numerous times, the tool needs to adapt to the work and not adapt the work around the tool.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[7]: Not interesting
by nefer on Mon 12th Mar 2012 22:42 in reply to "RE[6]: Not interesting"
nefer Member since:
2012-02-15

That still doesn't mean squat to someone who wants to sort his files his bloody way.

You can spend millions in R&D creating a foolproof filesystem that thinks it does an optimal job, but at the end of the day people who create stuff will still want to sort their work the best way they see fit.


Nobody forces you to buy Apple products. If you want to use old paradigms on new computers, there are a range of alternatives to choose from.

I'm sure you can find a tablet to run COBOL if you would need to. Most people, however, will move on with the times and leave filesystems for what they are.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Not interesting
by phoenix on Thu 8th Mar 2012 23:19 in reply to "RE[5]: Not interesting"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

IOW, since (some) people can't be bothered to organise their files, we should remove all capabilities to organise files? How backward is that.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: Not interesting
by galvanash on Fri 9th Mar 2012 05:11 in reply to "RE[6]: Not interesting"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

IOW, since (some) people can't be bothered to organise their files, we should remove all capabilities to organise files? How backward is that.


I know I'll get modded down, but what the hell...

There are historically two common interface paradigms in GUI design - document centric and application centric. In document centric systems centralized file management is not only desirable, but pretty much mandatory - you need some kind of generalized file management UI.

Almost all GUIs in common use combine both systems at the same time. iOS on the other hand is completely application centric - it was designed to work that way.

Whether you like it or not, adding file management to an application centric UI corrodes it - the whole point is to avoid it entirely. It is a trade-off. It simplifies things for the user dramatically because, if done right, file management simply becomes unnecessary.

Is iOS done right? it certainly has its flaws... But at this point if Apple breaks down and implements a "Finder" on iOS, they may as well admit defeat. I'm not saying there aren't things that need to be fixed to improve usability, but adding file management is the last thing they should be doing. That's like adding a steering wheel to a train - once you do it you no longer have a train...

I'm just saying, it's not backwards - its simply different. You may not think it is better, but some people at least think it can be better if done right.

Reply Parent Score: 6