Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 14th Mar 2012 19:37 UTC
Internet & Networking Ever since it became clear that Google was not going to push WebM as hard as they should have, the day would come that Mozilla would be forced to abandon its ideals because the large technology companies don't care about an open, unencumbered web. No decision has been made just yet, but Mozilla is taking its first strides to adding support for the native H.264 codecs installed on users' mobile systems. See it as a thank you to Mozilla for all they've done for the web.
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RE[2]: Whatevs.
by 1c3d0g on Wed 14th Mar 2012 20:57 UTC in reply to "RE: Whatevs."
1c3d0g
Member since:
2005-07-06

This is true. Also, you have to look on the hardware side of things. Yes, software plays a vital role, but it can only work if the hardware is there. Unfortunately for us (and fortunately for the MPEG-LA cartel), many companies incorporated h.264 hardware accelerators into their set-top boxes, Blu ray players etc. They also made their machines compatible with h.264, but excluded the other codecs, especially the open source ones.

Right there it's as if we're fighting with one arm only. We're severely handicapped already. Add to the fact that most companies want the h.264 codec to prevail above all others (for their own selfish reasons), and it's a lost war. It's unfortunate that things had to turn out this way. I was looking forward for at least WebM videos, but it seems companies are too ingrained in this industry to change for the better.

Edited 2012-03-14 20:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Whatevs.
by shmerl on Wed 14th Mar 2012 21:10 in reply to "RE[2]: Whatevs."
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

The war is not lost. But if Mozilla will give up (following Google), the war will last much longer.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Whatevs.
by zima on Sun 18th Mar 2012 14:35 in reply to "RE[3]: Whatevs."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Either way, "the war" will last right about the amount of time it takes for H264 patents to lapse, if I'd have to guess...
(so, only around or a little over a decade left)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Whatevs.
by lemur2 on Wed 14th Mar 2012 23:53 in reply to "RE[2]: Whatevs."
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

This is true. Also, you have to look on the hardware side of things. Yes, software plays a vital role, but it can only work if the hardware is there. Unfortunately for us (and fortunately for the MPEG-LA cartel), many companies incorporated h.264 hardware accelerators into their set-top boxes, Blu ray players etc. They also made their machines compatible with h.264, but excluded the other codecs, especially the open source ones.

Right there it's as if we're fighting with one arm only. We're severely handicapped already. Add to the fact that most companies want the h.264 codec to prevail above all others (for their own selfish reasons), and it's a lost war. It's unfortunate that things had to turn out this way. I was looking forward for at least WebM videos, but it seems companies are too ingrained in this industry to change for the better.


WebM accelerated video hardware is included in almost all new mobile hardware these days. Even iPad2s use Imagination Technologies PoweVR graphics

http://www.imgtec.com/corporate/newsdetail.asp?NewsID=597

"Imagination Technologies, a leading multimedia and communications technologies company, announces the latest additions to its multi-standard, multi-stream video IP core families, the POWERVR VXD392 decoder and POWERVR VXE382 encoder, including support for H.264 MVC, WebM (VP8; decode), S3D (Stereoscopic 3D) and resolutions up to UltraHD."

http://www.webmproject.org/about/supporters/

http://blog.webmproject.org/2011/11/time-of-dragonflies.html

In total, over 50 semiconductor companies have licensed the VP8 technology today. The first devices with 1080p VP8 decoding are today in the consumer market from nearly a dozen different brands (see example here), and the first chips capable of VP8 encoding will ship in 2012.

There is actually a newer version of hardware decoding beyond the dragonfly version:

http://blog.webmproject.org/2012/02/vp8-hw-decoder-version-5-eagle-...

and the encoder:

http://blog.webmproject.org/2012/02/fifth-generation-vp8-hardware-e...

This fifth version won't be appearing in actual hardware just yet, however, but the earlier versions are certainly shipping.

Edited 2012-03-14 23:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[4]: Whatevs.
by saynte on Thu 15th Mar 2012 04:17 in reply to "RE[3]: Whatevs."
saynte Member since:
2007-12-10

iPad 2s may use PowerVR chipsets, but not the chipsets that you cite. They use SGX series parts, where you cite VXD and VXE series. So that's not really relevant, unless proximity to VP8 is what you were going for.

Reply Parent Score: 3