Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 15th Mar 2012 22:06 UTC
Legal "If you download potentially copyrighted software, videos or music, your Internet service provider has been watching, and they're coming for you. Specifically, they're coming for you on Thursday, July 12. That's the date when the nation's largest ISPs will all voluntarily implement a new anti-piracy plan that will engage network operators in the largest digital spying scheme in history, and see some users' bandwidth completely cut off until they sign an agreement saying they will not download copyrighted materials." One day, years from now, historians are going to debate whether this was the point of no return.
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Technical question about torrents
by ozonehole on Fri 16th Mar 2012 01:56 UTC
ozonehole
Member since:
2006-01-07

One thing I'm curious about. I suppose that your ISP can know that you're downloading/uploading torrents, but can they know just what you are downloading or from whom? In Ktorrent, I do see in the Configuration section a dialog box for "Use Protocol Encryption" which I have not clicked (default is to allow unencrypted connections). I thought that clicking this might eliminate most connections, but maybe it would just slow them down. If so, how much additional overhead would it entail?

There is another dialog box to "Send the tracker a custom IP address or hostname" and then you have to specify one, but I haven't enabled that feature either, and just wondering if I should (and if so, what "custom IP address" would I use).

I have thought of enabling my browser's feature to encrypt all connections for HTML, but I think that would also cause more overhead though I'm not sure how much. And I also wonder if it would really make a difference as far as my ISP's ability to spy on me. Any thoughts on this will be appreciated.

Finally, someone mentioned using a VPN, even if you have to pay for it. I might be willing to do so, but can anyone recommend any such services? And how do I enable that feature in my browser or torrents once I've paid?

And no, I'm not engaged in piracy here. But I really don't like being tracked on the Internet by anyone. To think that there is someone out there compiling my entire browsing history, not to mention other family members (we all share a single wireless router, with encryption turned on of course) is worrisome.

Edited 2012-03-16 01:57 UTC

Reply Score: 2

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

In Ktorrent, I do see in the Configuration section a dialog box for "Use Protocol Encryption" which I have not clicked (default is to allow unencrypted connections). I thought that clicking this might eliminate most connections, but maybe it would just slow them down. If so, how much additional overhead would it entail?


None that you would notice nowadays. A few years ago, encrypted connections would have been few and far between. But most torrent clients default to allowing both (encrypted and plain-text). With only 2 torrents running, I'm getting over 300 KBps (~2.4 Mbps) with just encrypted connections.

I have thought of enabling my browser's feature to encrypt all connections for HTML, but I think that would also cause more overhead though I'm not sure how much.


Unless you have an ancient P2 system, you won't notice. CPUs now are mostly idle. Adding 1-5% extra CPU processing is nothing.

And I also wonder if it would really make a difference as far as my ISP's ability to spy on me. Any thoughts on this will be appreciated.


They'll be able to see your DNS requests, so they'll know which sites you're going to, but they won't know what you are doing on those sites.

Finally, someone mentioned using a VPN, even if you have to pay for it. I might be willing to do so, but can anyone recommend any such services? And how do I enable that feature in my browser or torrents once I've paid?


You don't "enable it in the browser or torrents". You change your default route (default gateway) to be the VPN IP instead of your ISP. Then all traffic (browser, torrent, *everything*) goes through the encrypted link. They won't even be able to see your DNS requests.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Lorin Member since:
2010-04-06

I have used HideMyAss, works very good and very noob friendly

Reply Parent Score: -1

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

I suppose that your ISP can know that you're downloading/uploading torrents, but can they know just what you are downloading or from whom?


What you're downloading? For unencrypted connections it is possible. For encrypted connections it's theoretically possible but practically impossible. No, the snake-oil products that that say they can do this does not count.
As for whom your downloading from; yes they can see what IP addresses you're communicating with unless you're using something like Tor or a VPN.

If so, how much additional overhead would it entail?

On any reasonably modern computer the overhead is negligible.

I have thought of enabling my browser's feature to encrypt all connections for HTML, but I think that would also cause more overhead though I'm not sure how much


This is not a feature that you can enable, you have to use https:// rather then http:// and even then there will be connections and sites that are not encrypted.

And how do I enable that feature in my browser or torrents once I've paid?


All you have to do is connect to the VPN, you don't need to changer anything in your browser or torrent app.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Flatland_Spider Member since:
2006-09-01

VyprVPN looks pretty good.
https://www.goldenfrog.com/vyprvpn/

Reply Parent Score: 1