Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 15th Mar 2012 22:06 UTC
Legal "If you download potentially copyrighted software, videos or music, your Internet service provider has been watching, and they're coming for you. Specifically, they're coming for you on Thursday, July 12. That's the date when the nation's largest ISPs will all voluntarily implement a new anti-piracy plan that will engage network operators in the largest digital spying scheme in history, and see some users' bandwidth completely cut off until they sign an agreement saying they will not download copyrighted materials." One day, years from now, historians are going to debate whether this was the point of no return.
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RE[2]: Warnings
by Alfman on Fri 16th Mar 2012 06:43 UTC in reply to "RE: Warnings"
Alfman
Member since:
2011-01-28

I'm not sure what level of invasiveness they'll be allowed to use. It may be "only" monitoring traffic passively. (I say "only" here with great hesitation, can't believe we're living through an age when corporate spying on private communications is legal and acceptable). If it is passive, then encryption will be 100% safe against it.

On the other hand, if they're going to add participating nodes and tamper with packets to perform man in the middle attacks, then unauthenticated P2P encryption is useless since a client cannot know whether it's communicating to a real peer or the ISP's spy proxy. To resolve this, peers would need to authenticate using out of band (non-p2p) mechanisms. Conceivably centralized services could provide that authentication, but then there'd be little stopping the spies themselves from being authenticated.

On the other hand, tor proxies and the like do provide plausible deniability. I do wonder if tor users will have their internet service shut down on account of third party activities? If so, people using tor for perfectly legal private communications might be effectively prohibited keeping their traffic private in the future.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Warnings
by Soulbender on Sat 17th Mar 2012 03:57 in reply to "RE[2]: Warnings"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

if they're going to add participating nodes and tamper with packets to perform man in the middle attacks


Hmm...you are right. I thought the torrent p2p encryption was better than it apparently is. It's just a fancy way to obfuscate the traffic.

On the other hand, tor proxies and the like do provide plausible deniability.


I'm just waiting for the MPAA/RIAA mafia to lobby for making encryption illegal. Well, illegal for private citizens, that is.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Even they can't be that stupid...
by shotsman on Sat 17th Mar 2012 11:06 in reply to "RE[3]: Warnings"
shotsman Member since:
2005-07-22

Or can they...

If they do make use of any encryption illegal for private citizens then you can say gooby bye to

- All your online shopping
- No more On-line banking

So the likes of Amazon, Ebay and all the rest will go to the wall.

Have you ever considered how many times you use HTTPS in your normal daily activities on the internet?
It is scary.
In short they would (if they took this up) want to han all the use of HTTPS.

Nah, they can't be that stupid...

Or can they ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3