Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 18th Mar 2012 19:08 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems "Some of my recent time has been devoted to making our boot media more Mac friendly, which has entailed rather a lot of rebooting. This would have been fine, if tedious, except that some number of boots would fall over with either a clearly impossible kernel panic or userspace segfaulting in places that made no sense. Something was clearly wrong. Crashes that shouldn't happen are generally an indication of memory corruption. The question is how that corruption is being triggered. Hunting that down wasn't terribly easy." Very interesting - and, unlike what the title suggest, not particularly related to the secure boot stuff.
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Like everything else
by Poseidon on Sun 18th Mar 2012 23:06 UTC
Poseidon
Member since:
2009-10-31

Every time there's a major hardware foundation switch, this is expected to happen. Like ISA to PCI, PCI to AGP (for graphics) etc. The sad reality is that developers need to actually dig in to the UEFI standard and learn its innars, issues and limitations. You just can't expect it to work seamlessly given the astounding changes done to the whole hardware and language.

UEFI is here to stay and hopefully everyone does their homework/provide feedback also to the developers so that in future versions the issues are take care of.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Like everything else
by Delgarde on Mon 19th Mar 2012 01:01 in reply to "Like everything else"
Delgarde Member since:
2008-08-19

Every time there's a major hardware foundation switch, this is expected to happen. Like ISA to PCI, PCI to AGP (for graphics) etc. The sad reality is that developers need to actually dig in to the UEFI standard and learn its innars, issues and limitations.


Not quite the same. Matthew Garrett *does* dig into the spec - indeed, he's probably one of the most knowledgeable people you could find on the subject.

The problem is that UEFI implementations seem to be *very* flaky, and not very good at conforming to the specification. They work fine with the OS they were developed for (MacOS, mostly), but are a real pain as soon as you try doing something that the spec says should work, but which never got tested.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Like everything else
by Poseidon on Mon 19th Mar 2012 02:00 in reply to "RE: Like everything else"
Poseidon Member since:
2009-10-31

UEFI was actually developed for HP and their Itanium servers. I used it sparingly back in the early 2002s. I can confirm that it was a piece of absolute crap in its initial forms (it would lose saved settings for no apparent), but the one we have nowadays is absolutely awesome.

I wonder if this is just the EFI for that specific version or the mac or if it is the same across the board.

Unless they have the hardware to test it its a crapshoot.

Reply Parent Score: 3