Linked by David Adams on Tue 20th Mar 2012 17:27 UTC, submitted by sawboss
Hardware, Embedded Systems "In the world of hard drives storage, density is king and Seagate has just achieved a major breakthrough that guarantees major storage gains for the next decade. That breakthrough is managing to squeeze 1 terabit (1 trillion bits) of data into a square inch or space, effectively opening the way for larger hard drives over the coming years beyond the 3TB maximum we currently enjoy. How much of an improvement does this storage milestone offer? Current hard drives max out at around 620 gigabits per square inch, meaning Seagate has improved upon that by over 50%. However, that's just the beginning."
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Faster now !
by Neolander on Tue 20th Mar 2012 21:40 UTC
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

Alright, now if only someone could find a software or hardware method to turn a slow multi-TB hard drive into a superfast ~200GB hard drive... Perhaps possible by using a variant of RAID between drive platters ?

I believe I'm not the only one findind the capacity of modern HDDs too big for domestic use, and getting a compromise between SSD's speed and "pure" hard drive price and reliability could be pretty cool...

Edited 2012-03-20 21:45 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Faster now !
by aligatro on Tue 20th Mar 2012 22:29 in reply to "Faster now !"
aligatro Member since:
2010-01-28

I was under the impression that it already does it. It reads multiple metal disks at the same time, to parallelise read and write. The only way to make it faster is to add more disks. I suspect those new harddrives are going to be almost as fast as average SSD. They increased physical density, so much more information can be read/written at the same time.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Faster now !
by Neolander on Wed 21st Mar 2012 07:56 in reply to "RE: Faster now !"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

I wonder... Since LBA has been the norm, are OSs still in control of where their data goes on the HDD, or is it the job of a hard drive's manufacturer to propose a LBA->physical geometry mapping which verifies such laws as "First LBA blocks are accessed faster" ?

In any case, if the full drive capacity is kept, II guess that constant monitoring of disk usage and moving data around would be necessary in order to keep the most frequently used data in the first sectors. I was thinking of something simpler, more along the lines of putting exactly the same content on all disks (like RAID 1 does with multiple HDDs), which slows down writes a little but should vastly increase read speeds.

Edited 2012-03-21 08:03 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Faster now !
by magick on Wed 21st Mar 2012 01:06 in reply to "Faster now !"
magick Member since:
2005-08-29

Alright, now if only someone could find a software or hardware method to turn a slow multi-TB hard drive into a superfast ~200GB hard drive...

Actually, there is a method and a fairly simple one. You could use only outher most tracks (cylinders). Reducing multi-TB drive to only several hundred GB would provide quite some 'speediness'.

And another thing... RAID is not a substitution for backup it is mainly a method for increasing system's availability. Always backup your (important) data!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Faster now !
by Neolander on Wed 21st Mar 2012 08:00 in reply to "RE: Faster now !"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Actually, there is a method and a fairly simple one. You could use only outher most tracks (cylinders). Reducing multi-TB drive to only several hundred GB would provide quite some 'speediness'.

Don't modern filesystems already try to do this as a default ?

And another thing... RAID is not a substitution for backup it is mainly a method for increasing system's availability. Always backup your (important) data!

Yes, I know that disks in RAID are at the same physical location and thus vulnerable to the same external breakage factors. However, I was only considering the ability of RAID to speed-up disk reads here, write redundancy being only a way to achieve this goal.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Faster now !
by OSbunny on Wed 21st Mar 2012 06:59 in reply to "Faster now !"
OSbunny Member since:
2009-05-23

I believe they already have something like that. Its called a Western Digital Raptor. Another option is the hybrid Momentus series of drives from seagate.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Faster now !
by tanishaj on Wed 21st Mar 2012 17:14 in reply to "Faster now !"
tanishaj Member since:
2010-12-22

Alright, now if only someone could find a software or hardware method to turn a slow multi-TB hard drive into a superfast ~200GB hard drive


Perhaps we will start to see consumer level systems using RAID (or RAID like) multi-platter storage with SSDs (or even RAIDs of them) acting as a kind of cache.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Faster now !
by Neolander on Wed 21st Mar 2012 18:08 in reply to "RE: Faster now !"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Perhaps we will start to see consumer level systems using RAID (or RAID like) multi-platter storage with SSDs (or even RAIDs of them) acting as a kind of cache.

I have mixed feelings about these hybrid drives with SSD caches (which already exist). On one hand, they offer an interesting compromise between HDD capacity and SSD speed. On the other hand, can the drive fallback nicely to "pure" hard drive operation when the SSD fails ?

Reply Parent Score: 1