Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 20th Mar 2012 22:47 UTC
Linux "If you meet Linus Torvalds, he comes off as a mild-mannered, down-to-earth Finnish-American. He lives with his wife Tove, three kids, a cat, a dog, a snake, a goldfish, a bunny and a pet rat in a comfortable 6000 square foot home just north of Portland's tony Lake Oswego neighborhood. The house is yellow - his favorite color - and so's the Mercedes. But he's not really like any of his neighbors. He drives his Mercedes fast, slamming the car into gear and flooring it. There's no coaxing, no hesitation. Either the hammer is down, or the car is at rest. And he has an abnormal number of stuffed penguins on his mantle." Yup, sounds like the to-the-point Fin we all know and love.
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RE: I like Linus
by kwan_e on Tue 20th Mar 2012 23:38 UTC in reply to "I like Linus"
kwan_e
Member since:
2007-02-18

He seems much more pragmatic about things than Stallman.


Everyone says Stallman is religious, but I don't think everyone has thought it through at all.

The GPL, for example, acknowledges the fact that people would like to be rewarded for their work, so it requires people give source code back. If people don't like it, then they don't use GPL code in their own code.

BSD apologists, on the other hand, are willing to sacrifice actual freedoms in return for an ideological freedom. And if ideological freedom is not religious then I don't know what is. The pragmatic Linus Torvalds chooses to remain with the GPL for pragmatic reasons.

Who is REALLY religious in the open source world are people like Theo de Raadt. And even then, given the security work that comes out of that, I say that's not a bad thing. In this case, being religious about standards of work delivers results.

Not to mention that Stallman's predictions about our rights being taken away are widely acknowledged to be happening. People are being denied to right to read or see videos or listen to music on their own terms.

I've come to the conclusion that anyone who says Stallman is "religious" or "ideological" haven't actually thought things through at all, but rather following popular opinion because it's fashionable.

Reply Parent Score: 16

v RE[2]: I like Linus
by lucas_maximus on Wed 21st Mar 2012 00:07 in reply to "RE: I like Linus"
RE[3]: I like Linus
by Lennie on Wed 21st Mar 2012 00:28 in reply to "RE[2]: I like Linus"
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

The developer can actually ask for money to create new programs and features. The GPL is very clear on that.

Only when the software is distributed to someone else, let's say the user. should the source be made available to that user.

So the user has the rights to take that work to an other developer and not be stuck with the original developer in cause of a conflict (of interrests or otherwise).

Also maybe it is just me, but AFAIK iOS on iPhone and iPad doesn't have the notion of a files either (to the user).

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: I like Linus
by ParadoxUncreated on Wed 21st Mar 2012 08:37 in reply to "RE[2]: I like Linus"
ParadoxUncreated Member since:
2009-12-05

Closed software is a pain. Do we really need to make money of software tools? Ofcourse money can be made on servicing opensource.

I`ve seen many closed software companies come and go. Each time the same problem. What they spent their time on developing, researching and bugtesting, now has to be repeated by someone else, with more or less success, and maybe with other strenghts. Can be a real PITA if one has gotten used to some piece of software and love it.

If it was opensource, none of these problems would bother us.

Life should be all about the user experience. We are not here to put sadistic restrainments on ourselves. And that is what closed source vs opensource seems to be.

Peace.

Edited 2012-03-21 08:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: I like Linus
by BluenoseJake on Wed 21st Mar 2012 14:13 in reply to "RE: I like Linus"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

BSD apologists? Really? I don't even know what to say, other than perhaps OSS would make some more inroads into consumer computing if the different factions would just realize that the goal is the same, even if the license is not.

You sounds pretty religious yourself.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: I like Linus
by kwan_e on Wed 21st Mar 2012 15:00 in reply to "RE[2]: I like Linus"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

BSD apologists? Really? I don't even know what to say, other than perhaps OSS would make some more inroads into consumer computing if the different factions would just realize that the goal is the same, even if the license is not.

You sounds pretty religious yourself.


Reading this thread, I've come to the conclusions that people don't even have a good idea of what being "religious" means.

It's just become a name to call someone when you have no logical reasons to back up your point of view.

Go on, tell me what exactly I've said makes me sound "pretty religious".

Hints:

"Religious" does not mean "having beliefs" and certainly not "having strong opinions".

"Religious" is probably being used where "fundamentalist" may be a better term. A part of being "religious" and "fundamentalist" involves strict ideology and some literalism.

"Religious" is not "fanatical" although it commonly does include fanatical elements. Having many different lines of argument is not fanatical. Fanatical often implies the brushing aside of logical arguments. Defense of a belief is not fanatical.

------------------------

I have no problem with people choosing either BSD or GPL licences. It's a matter of choice. The FSF lists the BSD as GPL compatible, but I have only ever come across attacks on the GPL from people who like BSD style licences. They say unbelievable things, like "GPL steals your code". GPL can't steal your code if you don't use GPL code. You are not obligated to choose GPL projects. And yet you get this line of argument from BSD apologists all the time.

Reply Parent Score: 4