Linked by David Adams on Mon 19th Mar 2012 17:04 UTC, submitted by diegocg
Linux Linux 3.3 has been released. The changes include the merge of kernel code from the Android project. There is also support for a new architecture (TI C6X), much improved balancing and the ability to restripe between different RAID profiles in Btrfs, and several network improvements: a virtual switch implementation (Open vSwitch) designed for virtualization scenarios, a faster and more scalable alternative to the "bonding" driver, a configurable limit to the transmission queue of the network devices to fight bufferbloat, a network priority control group and per-cgroup TCP buffer limits. There are also many small features and new drivers and fixes are also available. Here's the full changelog.
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RE[3]: vSwitch?
by Laurence on Wed 21st Mar 2012 11:54 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: vSwitch?"
Laurence
Member since:
2007-03-26


The difference is that Solaris is doing new and innovative development. I mean, GRUB is nothing new nor innovative. Boot loaders have existed earlier. GNOME is nothing new nor innovative.

But ZFS is new and innovative. Crossbow too. Zones too. DTrace too. etc

So where is the new innovations in Linux? GRUB? Gnome? Nowhere. It is just polished versions of old software, and nothing new and unique.

Thus, Linux copies stuff from Solaris but no new innovative tech comes from Linux. Everything is just copies. Heck, even the entire Linux is just a Unix copy. Everything in Linux is a copy.

Well yeah, Sun had pioneered a number of fantastic technologies. But they were the exception rather than the norm. Most software houses and most OSs are re-implementations + improvements. Be that Linux, OS X, Windows, FreeBSD or whatever.

Sadly Oracle have pretty much killed any innovation Sun had, so this argument is rapidly becoming moot.

[edit]
I've just read your other post re giving credit vs denying inspiration and that explains your stance a lot clearer than you had here. Taking that post into account, I 100% agree with you ;)

Edited 2012-03-21 11:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: vSwitch?
by Kebabbert on Wed 21st Mar 2012 12:43 in reply to "RE[3]: vSwitch?"
Kebabbert Member since:
2007-07-27

I've just read your other post re giving credit vs denying inspiration and that explains your stance a lot clearer than you had here. Taking that post into account, I 100% agree with you ;)

Ok, Laurence, you seem to be a normal sane guy. I am glad there are Linux people (if you are that?) that gives credit where it is due.

I myself copy, but I always give credit. Everybody copies, but you should always give credit and not try to claim it as your own idea.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: vSwitch?
by Laurence on Wed 21st Mar 2012 13:50 in reply to "RE[4]: vSwitch?"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


Ok, Laurence, you seem to be a normal sane guy. I am glad there are Linux people (if you are that?) that gives credit where it is due.

I myself copy, but I always give credit. Everybody copies, but you should always give credit and not try to claim it as your own idea.

hehehe thank you though I wouldn't really call myself a "Linux person". I'm actually a big fan of Solaris as well as Linux. I remember trying Zones out for the 1st time and being blown away by how powerful they were and yet how simple to create. Those systems have since been migrated to FreeBSD after the Oracle/Sun takeover, however I still run a number of old Solaris 8 boxes on ageing SPARC hardware.

I think if I had to pick a favourite, I'd probably side with FreeBSD - which has only become even more epic since they've ported ZFS.

So all in all, I wouldn't say I have any particular allegiance to Linux over any other *nix OS.

Reply Parent Score: 2