Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 22nd Mar 2012 19:44 UTC
Graphics, User Interfaces "Adobe has been dropping preview links to its upcoming version of Photoshop CS6 for months now, even hyping it up with a Rainn Wilson cameo at MAX 2011. Photoshop CS6 marks one of the app's most drastic visual changes, with a darker visual redesign and streamlined toolbars, and it has all sorts of changes to cursors, filters, video editing, and more in tow. We got some quick hands on time with the app, so read on for our take on Adobe's next-gen installation of Photoshop."
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RE[5]: Rewrite?
by Neolander on Fri 23rd Mar 2012 18:15 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Rewrite?"
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

I was thinking about Mac OS Classic and DOS-based versions of Windows, yes.

These were built before memory protection was the norm, at a time where every developer would access hardware directly. Clearly, this was fundamentally flawed as soon as malware was everywhere, and had to be changed.

Nothing comparable to the appearance of protected mode has happened in the hardware world since Windows NT and OS X have been out. The technology which we use today is highly similar to the technology of these days, although we now have minor changes such as more CPU cores, flash drives, or faster GPUs.

The increasing popularity of mobile devices should have driven the creation of general-purpose OSs designed with power efficiency in mind, like Symbian was, but in practice this has not happened. We have just slapped desktop kernels on cellphones and decided to use bigger batteries and tolerate battery lives that were still barely bearable.

Edited 2012-03-23 18:27 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Rewrite?
by lucas_maximus on Fri 23rd Mar 2012 19:19 in reply to "RE[5]: Rewrite?"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

It is easier to throw hardware at the problem rather than optimize the software. It is a short term solution for now and works well when during a period of churn (like we do with mobiles) ... from 1995 - 2008 it really mattered if your PC was good enough to run windows ... now even the lowest spec machines can run it fine and tbh most games (I have a 5 year old GPU and can still run most of the newest PC games).

Edited 2012-03-23 19:23 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Rewrite?
by Alfman on Sat 24th Mar 2012 07:09 in reply to "RE[6]: Rewrite?"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

lucas_maximus,

"It is easier to throw hardware at the problem rather than optimize the software."

My experience in the industry is that many managers just say throw hardware at it. One of my old employers bought software which intercepted web service requests from one proprietary system and proxied them over to another using a different mechanism. It was written as a tomcat application server and that's literally all it did. Our network admin installed it in a VM with a gig or so of ram and it was crashing left and right. I
worked with tech support and they wanted us to install it on dual core with at least 2GB of ram, and sure enough that fixed it. Things like that make me cringe.


Fast hardware can reduce the effects of certain types of inefficiencies, but sometimes it's still there. We can look at inefficiencies in economic terms too, like placing a figure on having millions of users waiting a few extra seconds every day. I'm willing to bet that cost quickly overtakes the cost of developers fixing the inefficiency, but of course companies like MS don't really care about those external costs even when they are responsible for them.

Perhaps if companies were to internalize those costs, then they'd change their tune! (Of course I am biased, I'd like to see more demand for my optimization skills).

Reply Parent Score: 2