Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 25th Mar 2012 21:28 UTC
In the News A few months ago, I wrote an article about comments, in which I said, among others things, that Twitter can never replace comments because not only is it effectively a one-to-one communication channel, Twitter messages are also far too short to foster any form of coherent conversation. Over the weekend, a silly link-bait story illustrated my point perfectly.
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RE[2]: 140 characters
by darknexus on Mon 26th Mar 2012 19:24 UTC in reply to "RE: 140 characters"
darknexus
Member since:
2008-07-15

Take this one step further : why are texts still 160 chars long (or 70 if you add just one single Unicode character) in 2012 ? And why does a message weighting less than 1 KB cost around 10 cents in most countries ?


You know, this is precisely where Apple could really shake things up and get competition going again, if they cared to. Take iMessage. Let's say they offered it free to Apple device users, then made apps for Android, WP7, and Windows (if you can trust Apple with Windows software after what they've done with iTunes) and charged users of those apps a subscription, perhaps $5 per month? This would encourage the carriers to compete, which would bring the cost down and may even improve the total user experience for everyone along the way. More apps would mean more people using iMessage instead of the carrier plans, this would mean that carriers lost money and had to make something better, and everyone would win in the end. It's too bad that Apple doesn't realize the opportunity they have here, and would rather keep such services locked to their own devices. They have every right to do this of course, but it does sadden me to see so much potential for improvement go unexploited. Apple are one of the few companies who could do this successfully in our climate of business, as they've got not only the money but the legal force to resist attacks by other large giants.

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