Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th Apr 2012 13:53 UTC
Legal "Cyber attacks on IT systems would become a criminal offence punishable by at least two years in prison throughout the EU under a draft law backed by the Civil Liberties Committee on Tuesday. Possessing or distributing hacking software and tools would also be an offence, and companies would be liable for cyber attacks committed for their benefit." Wait, what?
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Oh my...
by weland on Wed 4th Apr 2012 14:04 UTC
weland
Member since:
2012-02-19

Oh my, I´d better remove Wireshark from my computer, they´ll never believe I´m only using it to sniff USB packets.

Civil Liberties Committee my ass.

Reply Score: 8

RE: Oh my...
by kokara4a on Wed 4th Apr 2012 14:23 in reply to "Oh my..."
kokara4a Member since:
2005-09-16

Civil Liberties Committee my ass.


It's called doublespeak.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE: Oh my...
by KrustyVader on Wed 4th Apr 2012 16:15 in reply to "Oh my..."
KrustyVader Member since:
2006-10-28

Don't forget Tcpdump.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Oh my...
by Lennie on Thu 5th Apr 2012 20:57 in reply to "RE: Oh my..."
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

So what is a hacking tool ? nmap ? fping ? nc/telnet ? a compiler and API-documentation ? Any scripting language like Perl ?

"Hacking" really is just about sending the right series of bytes to a distination or maybe even a broadcast.

The recent Windows Remote Desktop vulnerability (MS12-020) is a perfect example and the instructions how to test for the vulnerability are:

nc SERVER 3389 < termdd_1.dat

It really is that simple.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Oh my...
by sagum on Wed 4th Apr 2012 18:23 in reply to "Oh my..."
sagum Member since:
2006-01-23

Oh my, I´d better remove Wireshark from my computer, they´ll never believe I´m only using it to sniff USB packets.

Civil Liberties Committee my ass.



Not only that, but I'm pretty sure we all have hacking tools built into Windows.

Using a simple batch script, its possible to "ping" a range of IP, then use "net view". That can can be used to see shares even over the internet, sometimes entire drives being shared with read/write permissions. Thus giving 100% access to the remote PC using basic Windows 'hacking tools'.

Not only that, but there are even more dangerous tools such as Windows Live Messenger that can be used to talk to said victim and ask for details of their password/security setup! :O That in itself maybe one of the worst hacking tools ever invented as it allows 100% social engineering capabilities.


AND lets not for get using email as well! Last week I got a email from a friend who got it forwarded on from her mum's dad's brothers, best friend's uncle who works at MI5 in NASA who personally knows the guy who put the virus on everyones computer, it was totally by accident, but the email said to check for System32 in the Windows folder. If you have it, you got the virus so to delete it. I think I was too late because all the virus I deleted from the 4 computers here stopped working! I'm so glad the EU is going to ban email, its soo bad.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: Oh my...
by Doc Pain on Wed 4th Apr 2012 21:34 in reply to "RE: Oh my..."
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

Not only that, but I'm pretty sure we all have hacking tools built into Windows.


Also consider that an important means of "distributed hacking" are botnets, typically consisting of hijacked "Windows" PCs that are carrying out the orders of the attacker who can hide in the background. Those PCs are hacking tools (given the broad idea of the definition of what "hacking" and maybe "cracking" is supposed to be interpreted). So everyone having a PC at home is in possession of a hacking tool which should be taken away.

Hell, meanwhile even (networked) printers can be used for hacking networks!

Furthermore, add corporate PC fleets to the mix. They're also a welcome means for performing DDoS attacks and sending spam, for committing industry espionage and data sabotage. As those also are hacking tools, they have to be removed from the offices.

Finally, everyone found guiltiy in having a hacking tool should pay. After all, getting the penalty fees is where the whole thing pays.

Do I see that correctly, or should I continue facing the telescreen telling me that WAR IS PEACE, FREEDOM IS SLAVERY, and IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH? :-)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Oh my...
by bitwelder on Thu 5th Apr 2012 07:57 in reply to "Oh my..."
bitwelder Member since:
2010-04-27

Who the heck is this "Civil Liberties Committee"?

A new agreement on the transfer of EU air passengers' personal data to the US Department of Homeland Security was approved by the Civil Liberties Committee of the European Parliament on 27 March.

(from http://www.neurope.eu/article/civil-liberties-committee-narrowly-pa... )

It does not seem to me too much of a protection of EU citizens civil liberties, although their name doesn't promise anything in that direction ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 2