Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 5th Apr 2012 22:35 UTC
Google Google's CEO, Larry Page, has just published a letter titled "2012 Update from the CEO". It's a state of the union-sort of thing, mostly filled with the usual stuff of how great Google supposedly is (we'll decide that for ourselves, why thank you). There's one bit in it, though, that caught my eye - something that puts Android's supposed fragmentation issues in a rather different light.
Thread beginning with comment 513061
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29


Yes, you make it sound like it was such an easy achievement that you could do it tomorrow with two hands tied behind your back.


Considering that Android was released when it was just the iPhone, somebody was going to become dominant by default.

Carriers were looking for an iPhone-like OS and Android fit the bill perfectly. It was a perfect storm.

It had absolutely nothing to do with any kind of superiority, or what have you. It was simply great timing and great coordination with operators. They catered completely to OEMs and UX suffered significantly for it.


And openness isn't limited to a "developer on Android doesn't really interface with any of the really low levels of the Operating System". In the olden days, you had to interface with the low levels and that resulted in you having to get x+y development kits from x+y vendors.


My point was that the openness is completely transparent to the user, there is no perceptible difference. So to that end, it's difficult for me to attribute openness as a magic success factor.

Reply Parent Score: 5

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Carriers were looking for an iPhone-like OS and Android fit the bill perfectly. It was a perfect storm.

It had absolutely nothing to do with any kind of superiority, or what have you. It was simply great timing and great coordination with operators.


This doesn't explain the fact that even outside of the US - where carriers' influence is limited and most people buy phones at third party retailers, mixing and matching phones/carriers/plans - Android is growing just as fast.

It just doesn't add up.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

OEMs are still king, and while I can't speak for the situation overseas as I don't really know, that'd be my guess as to why Android has been the smashing success.

I mean, Google made the conscious choice to go for reach over quality. Maybe they wouldn't call it quality, but flexibility if you will. They are extremely flexible, you can turn Android into almost whatever you want, on whatever hardware you'd like.

So its a trade off, but to say they fought tooth and nail for their success in any kind of desperate capacity that other mobile OSes are trying to do now, is I think a little much. They kinda accidently fell into success, and are doing a great job at keeping their momentum.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Panajev Member since:
2008-01-09

A lot of people buy smartphones thanks to carrier subsidized plans here (Italy).

Edited 2012-04-06 18:07 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

ARUmar Member since:
2009-10-08

for most of the markets outside the U.S price is the major driving factor IMHO seeing as some of the largest growth is being seen in the developing countries where the choice for a smart phone boils down to a sub 100 dollar phone potentially running the latest version of Android or a iOS device that costs easily three times the price.

Reply Parent Score: 1

henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

This doesn't explain the fact that even outside of the US - where carriers' influence is limited and most people buy phones at third party retailers, mixing and matching phones/carriers/plans - Android is growing just as fast.

It just doesn't add up.


Two things drive android (1) the amount of device choice (there is more than one model) and (2) price, when you can buy an android 2.x device on a pay as you go contract for under £100 (under £50 for some models) and own the device outright. Once momentum begins, your friends all have device X, that can really drive the take-up.

Reply Parent Score: 2