Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 10th Apr 2012 12:00 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Oh RIM. Already back-peddling on the whole 'let's remove sideloading to prevent the Android chaotic cesspool', are we? PR damage control mode engaged: "We're not getting rid of side-loading on the BlackBerry PlayBook OS or in BlackBerry 10." I think I know where the real chaotic cesspool is, RIM.
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Provide a use case then
by Not2Sure on Tue 10th Apr 2012 20:53 UTC
Not2Sure
Member since:
2009-12-07

Seriously, can someone besides Thom Holwerda, whose propensity for stealing anything he likes with the absurd justification he alone believes of "I would buy it if I could", please provide me with some valid use cases of "sideloading" on an embedded device from an end-user and not a developer perspective that does not involve software piracy, theft of intellectual property or malware. It's not entirely obvious to me as it is apparently to others why this should be supported.

We are not talking about a general purpose computing device we are talking about an embedded one.

Also, professionals need to start treating Twitter as professional communication and not a personal account where they wax nonsensical in 140 chars. It's beyond dumb. Just leak your "news" to the established bloggers and let them take the credibility hit if you want to keep using it in such a personal manner.

Reply Score: -7

RE: Provide a use case then
by Alfman on Tue 10th Apr 2012 21:32 in reply to "Provide a use case then"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

"please provide me with some valid use cases of 'sideloading' on an embedded device from an end-user and not a developer perspective that does not involve software piracy, theft of intellectual property or malware."


The ability to sideload allows alternate software distribution channels to take shape. Some, like Wii homebrew community, allow normal end users to install apps not normally available through through official channels. For example, using it to play internet radio stations, non-commercial games, utilities, etc. None of this is illegal and yet the console maker tries to block it anyway - all console makers do in fact.


Also, sideloading and other marketplaces enable to consumers to exorcise more options when a vendor stops supporting their hardware, so they don't have to throw it away.

Another case is when developers/users suffer from app store policies. One the iphone for example, some innovative apps are blocked on the basis that they include features that apple doesn't want an app to have, either because it competes with one of it's own apps, or it was written in a cross-compatible language, or some other reason that has nothing at all to do with illegal activity or copyright infringement.

These are all legitimate reasons for users to sideload.

Q.E.D.

Reply Parent Score: 9

v RE[2]: Provide a use case then
by Not2Sure on Tue 10th Apr 2012 21:59 in reply to "RE: Provide a use case then"
RE: Provide a use case then
by amadensor on Tue 10th Apr 2012 21:38 in reply to "Provide a use case then"
amadensor Member since:
2006-04-10

Easy point: VLC on IOS. Nothing illegal about VLC. The developers said it is fine to use it. Apple refuses to abide by their license terms, and so pulls it from the app store. VLC and the developers who own the software are fine with it, so no copyright infringement. It is just Apple not wanting to comply with their license.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Provide a use case then
by MOS6510 on Wed 11th Apr 2012 06:50 in reply to "RE: Provide a use case then"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Well, Apple did allow VLC on the app store. I downloaded it and I still have it and it still works.

They pulled it because one of the developers of VLC threatened to sue over GPL related stuff.

If he hadn't VLC would probably in the apps top 10 for quite a while.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2375476,00.asp

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Provide a use case then
by WorknMan on Tue 10th Apr 2012 23:10 in reply to "Provide a use case then"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

We are not talking about a general purpose computing device we are talking about an embedded one.


Well, in the case of the Playbook, we are talking about a tablet, and whether you like it or not, tablets ARE general purpose computing devices for a lot of people. In fact, I know one person who uses and iPad as her primary PC. there are debates raging about whether tablets and smartphones should be considered PCs, and where/how you draw the line.

Seriously, can someone besides Thom Holwerda, whose propensity for stealing anything he likes with the absurd justification he alone believes of "I would buy it if I could", please provide me with some valid use cases of "sideloading" on an embedded device from an end-user and not a developer perspective that does not involve software piracy, theft of intellectual property or malware. It's not entirely obvious to me as it is apparently to others why this should be supported.


Generally speaking, I hold the absurd belief that once you buy a device, you actually OWN it, and people shouldn't have to seek permission from faceless corporations to install whatever the hell they want on their devices. But to answer your question specifically, it depends on the platform, and I'll answer for the devices I own:

Amazon Kindle
I use side-loading to strip DRM from the books I buy, so I don't have any limitations on how many lines I can copy (I use a lot of books as reference material), and so I can convert them to audiobooks. In the US, this has been made legal. Also, I want to have backups of my ebooks in case they decide to pull another '1984' and start removing books from peoples' devices.

iOS
There are a crapton of cool apps in Cydia that Apple would not allow in their app store, including one that bumps the resolution of iPhone apps that are running on the iPad. And yes, I have even paid for some of these apps. You may not agree with folks violating Apple's TOS, but you wanted to know about cases of side loading where piracy wasn't involved, so there ya go.

Android
Some developers use side loading as a way to sell apps, because the Android Market... er, Google Play... is not supported in the country where they live.

PS - It is a shame that your comment was modded down. IMO, it is a valid question, with equally valid answers.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: Provide a use case then
by stabbyjones on Wed 11th Apr 2012 01:49 in reply to "Provide a use case then"
stabbyjones Member since:
2008-04-15