Linked by Howard Fosdick on Fri 13th Apr 2012 20:21 UTC
In the News Six-month-old web site Codecademy claims you can learn programming through its online tutorials. The free modules on JavaScript are now available. The site also allows anyone to post their own programming courses. The site has good funding, but question is: can you really learn programming this way? One blogger enthuses that Codecademy's approach "looks like the future of learning to me," while another slams it saying "Seriously? Wow, bull**** badging and sh**ty pedagogy wins the day in ed-tech investing." What do you think?
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Neat
by ToddB on Fri 13th Apr 2012 21:32 UTC
ToddB
Member since:
2012-01-25

I cut my teeth on Basic on Apple IIe Basic.. Then I moved on to programming calculators (Never had a computer growing up). I would fill up entire notebooks with programs I was doodling on in class before I finally took the time to input them slowly on graphing calculator. Now I primarily program in C++ for work. I think people just make programming into something way harder than it actually is, computers are very simple devices. You can move from memory to register and vice versa, do a math operation, a conditional branch and that is about it. Though from studies I have read, for some people programming is very difficult to impossible to learn whereas others pick it up naturally. Hopefully this site will help people discover which they are early on as a taste of possibly pursuing a career in programming. As far as computer science/software engineering goes, think it is a blessing wasn't taught these methods in school and had to learn them on my own. I often question how much value you get from a person who teaches programming for a living vs. someone who actually programs for a living.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Neat
by ephracis on Sat 14th Apr 2012 07:59 in reply to "Neat"
ephracis Member since:
2007-09-23

I think people just make programming into something way harder than it actually is, computers are very simple devices.

The hard part is not to write code, the hard part is to write good code.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: Neat
by Soulbender on Sat 14th Apr 2012 10:49 in reply to "Neat"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

I think people just make programming into something way harder than it actually is, computers are very simple devices.


Anyone can kick a football against a wall but that doesn't make it easy to become a professional footballer.

I often question how much value you get from a person who teaches programming for a living vs. someone who actually programs for a living.


I often question how much value you get from from a person who teaches sexual education for a living vs. someone who actually has sex for a living.

Edited 2012-04-14 10:51 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Neat
by Morgan on Sun 15th Apr 2012 22:17 in reply to "RE: Neat"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I agree with you completely on your first analogy, but the second is faulty to the point of being flamebait.

There is a lot of merit in completing a degree in a field you wish to work in, especially any kind of engineering. At the same time, no amount of education can take the place of in-the-field experience. Rather, I feel the two paths compliment each other, and when you combine real world experience with the discipline and knowledge gained in school, you have the best chance of being a great engineer.

Reply Parent Score: 2