Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 22nd Apr 2012 17:48 UTC
Google "Reports are coming in from around the Internet that the Gmail redesign, which we were previously able to stave off with 'revert to the old look temporarily', is now forcing itself upon us. I too have succumbed to the new design, and have been forced to find ways to cope. Here's what I did to make it semi-bearable." The Gmail redesign has been the biggest whine-a-thon in the history of the web ('cope'? Bearable'?). For what it's worth, the Gmail redesign has been a godsend for me - the new Gmail is beautiful, understated, and elegant. I love it. I guess the old adage still goes: the satisfied people don't take to the web.
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Any redesign is like that.
by leos on Sun 22nd Apr 2012 19:08 UTC
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

Anytime Facebook changes anything the whiners come out of the woodwork. "Waaah. How dare Facebook keep evolving! I'm 90 years old and can't handle change! This is the end times!"

Reply Score: 3

RE: Any redesign is like that.
by WorknMan on Mon 23rd Apr 2012 00:51 in reply to "Any redesign is like that."
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Anytime Facebook changes anything the whiners come out of the woodwork. "Waaah. How dare Facebook keep evolving! I'm 90 years old and can't handle change! This is the end times!"


I find that most of the time, the people who are whining about other people whining about changes actually LIKE the changes. If you don't like the change, why should you keep quiet about it, instead of letting these companies know how you feel? If Facebook throws on a new 'time line' feature that is an absolute clusterf**k, and Google+ gets ruined with a redesign where half the page is nothing but white space, what exactly is gained if all the people who hate it stay silent and just grit their teeth?

I am not a Gmail user, so can't comment on that redesign, but I think a lot of these companies would be well served to throw up a 'proof of concept' page to let users play around with it before committing to any major changes. But most of them don't do this, and we all end up suffering for it. In almost every single case, when a website does a complete makeover, the new design is a big step down from the old one.

Edited 2012-04-23 00:52 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2