Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 24th Apr 2012 17:39 UTC
Google Well, this has been a very, very long time in the making. Google has finally unveiled its big Dropbox competitor: Google Drive. You start with 5GB for free, and you can go all the way to 1TB for $50 per month. This is a big deal for many (if you were to use rumouring as a gauge), but all I can think of is this: why on earth would you entrust your files to a company - any company - whose sole interest is extracting money from you, and who, to boot, is subject to crazy American laws?
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RE: What about...
by sorpigal on Tue 24th Apr 2012 18:49 UTC in reply to "What about..."
sorpigal
Member since:
2005-11-02

A cheap network attachable device with exapndable storage that could replace dropbox...

There is so much ridiculous naivete in replies, but I'm going to single out yours.

A cheap NAS is no where near DropBox and it would be difficult to make it that way even with a layer of easy-to-install-and-configure software on top. If you think that it's comparable you don't understand DropBox and shouldn't be commenting.

If security is a concern, don't use DropBox. Instead use a service that does the encryption client side, e.g. SpiderOak, Wuala, etc.

ownCloud is good, of course, but not everyone can or will self host.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: What about...
by galvanash on Tue 24th Apr 2012 19:09 in reply to "RE: What about..."
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

A cheap NAS is no where near DropBox and it would be difficult to make it that way even with a layer of easy-to-install-and-configure software on top.


I realize dropbox has lots of features that would be difficult to next-to-impossible to replicate. I know what dropbox does.

The point is if you reduce it down to "have a local folder on your device (whatever device it may be) that is automatically synchronized with a central storage location (the NAS)", well then it is rather simple.

The rest is just additional features - some people will care about certain of those missing features, some won't. But the central function of the software is folder synchronization - everything else is just noise.

That is how software development works - you start with the basics, build a good foundation, and grow the features set from there. If you don't understand that maybe you shouldn't be commenting.

ownCloud is good, of course, but not everyone can or will self host.


This is for people who ONLY want to self host - that is the entire point... And if ownCloud is good, why couldn't it potentially be used on a Raspberry Pi? Im not saying it wouldn't be some work - the point though is to have a plug-and-play piece of hardware, not to recreate the entire featureset of dropbox.

The killer feature of dropbox is that is just fricken works. THAT is what you need to replicate, not the entire feature set. It didn't start out as a swiss army knife you know - originally it was pretty much just folder sync...

Edited 2012-04-24 19:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: What about...
by galvanash on Tue 24th Apr 2012 19:59 in reply to "RE[2]: What about..."
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

Just to drive it home... read this - it perfectly illustrates my point:

http://www.theserverside.com/discussions/thread.tss?thread_id=61647

(Quote from a post describing why dropbox is so popular)


Well, let's take a step back and think about the sync problem and what the ideal solution for it would do:

There would be a folder.
You'd put your stuff in it.
It would sync.
They built that.

Why didn't anyone else build that? I have no idea.

"But," you may ask, "so much more you could do! What about task management, calendaring, customized dashboards, virtual white boarding. More than just folders and files!"

No, shut up. People don't use that crap. They just want a folder. A folder that syncs.


Couldn't have put it better...

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[3]: What about... - data redundancy
by jabbotts on Wed 25th Apr 2012 15:42 in reply to "RE[2]: What about..."
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

To get the data redundancy and such, you'd likely need a drop-pi module that lets' it talk to S3 or similar hosted storage providers. Your little cloud needs a cloud-daddy or you may as well just carry a USB for all the benefit your gaining.

Mind you, at that point the question becomes; why are you not simply using the storage provider's client app instead of your drop-pi intermediary hardware.

For big budgets, one could also look at SpiderOak's appliance which is pretty much what you are trying to recreate.

Still, it's an interesting idea. The first thought when looking at Dropbox was "if they had an appliance that moved this thing inside my own network..".

Reply Parent Score: 3