Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 27th Apr 2012 22:00 UTC, submitted by koki
BeOS & Derivatives "Ultimately, Haiku represents a different way of viewing your personal computer. If you think that software shouldn't be riddled with bugs and incompatibilities and inefficiencies, if you hate being forced to swap out your hardware and software every few years because 'upgrades' have rendered them obsolete, and if you find that the idea of using an operating system that's fast, responsive, and simple is refreshingly novel and appealing, then maybe, just maybe, Haiku is for you." What fascinates me the most is that Haiku's not working on a tablet version. How delightfully quaint.
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RE[2]: So, let me get this straight
by einr on Sat 28th Apr 2012 11:17 UTC in reply to "RE: So, let me get this straight"
einr
Member since:
2012-02-15

It's a better designed operating system, almost entirely free of the MS-DOS and PC-AT legacy plague. I'm sure your Windows 7 installation is fast enough, but if you tried it, you'd be flabbergasted at just how incredibly responsive Haiku is. Whole different league. It boots in around 10 seconds on my four year old Atom-based netbook, everything just pops up as soon as you click on it -- it's really remarkable.

It's a better designed operating system; that doesn't mean it has better applications. This is still alpha-stage software and porting applications from GNU/Linux or Windows or Mac OS is not straightforward.

So the answer is: there's literally nothing right now you can do with Haiku that you can't do with Windows, except marvel at the sheer accomplishment.

Reply Parent Score: 0

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Listen, I loved BeOS and love Haiku as well. But, you have to be honest in your critisims of other operating systems. Throwing around things like "free of MS_DOS PC-AT legacy plague" Is just plain dishonest. There isn't any DOS legacy left in windows 7. If there is, what is it and why does it present a problem?

I think you are just commenting about the speed and responsiveness of the gui. Cool. Just leave it at that :" Hakui has a more responsive Gui". Don't blame it on DOS or pc-at, thats just absurd. Otherwise we could likewise say that Windows is better because it doesn't have that legacy at& t hobbit design plague.

Reply Parent Score: 2

redshift Member since:
2006-05-06

There isn't any DOS legacy left in windows 7. If there is, what is it and why does it present a problem?


I would think that the last that legacy was removed as windows was brought into a 64 bit architecture. I loved BeOS too back in the day.. but it is the one stuck in legacy mode now being 32 bit in a 64 bit world. 64 bit mode had a much bigger speed boost for X86 users over PowerPC because x86 had few registers. Haiku could probably get 20% faster with clean 64-bit code.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Megol Member since:
2011-04-11

Sure there is:
Con, aux and a lot of other strings are reserved names in Win32, you can't (easily) use them. Try creating a file named con.txt for example.

That's a DOS legacy even though NT in itself doesn't care about such things (and using native NT system calls is the way one can create/delete files with those names).

Reply Parent Score: 0

Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

Actually I think there are things I cannot do, still. I need to use a VPN that runs very specific cisco software... I am pretty sure it won't run on BeOS yet. I wish it would but...

Ah well. I do so miss my BeOS...

Reply Parent Score: 2

BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

There is no MSDOS in Windows NT, never has been. Windows 7 is the latest version of NT (Windows 8 is not RTM yet). OS X also has never been accused of being related to MSDOS, and neither has Linux or BSD.

The only real remnant of the AT era left in a modern PC is the BIOS, and new PCs are moving away from that.

Really, your whole post is just nonsense, let Haiku stand up on it's own, without BS such as this. I mean really, come on.

Reply Parent Score: 3

tuma324 Member since:
2010-04-09

There is no MSDOS in Windows NT, never has been. Windows 7 is the latest version of NT (Windows 8 is not RTM yet). OS X also has never been accused of being related to MSDOS, and neither has Linux or BSD.

The only real remnant of the AT era left in a modern PC is the BIOS, and new PCs are moving away from that.

Really, your whole post is just nonsense, let Haiku stand up on it's own, without BS such as this. I mean really, come on.


its own*

Reply Parent Score: 1

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

It's a better designed operating system, almost entirely free of the MS-DOS


It's entirely free of MS-DOS. Just like any other modern operating system today, except FreeDOS.

and PC-AT legacy plague.


It runs on PC, doesnt it? It supports IDE devices, right? Then it's not free of the PC-AT plague.

you'd be flabbergasted at just how incredibly responsive Haiku is.


Not really, I used BeOS so I know how responsive it is. On the other hand, DOS-SHELL was pretty responsive too..

It boots in around 10 seconds

It's a better designed operating system


There are more parameters to better design than raw speed.

Edited 2012-04-29 03:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

It's a better designed operating system, almost entirely free of the MS-DOS and PC-AT legacy plague. I'm sure your Windows 7 installation is fast enough, but if you tried it, you'd be flabbergasted at just how incredibly responsive Haiku is.

"free of the [...] PC-AT legacy plague" - it is Haiku that runs only on IA-32, while NT on... a few more architectures (NT didn't even start on x86)

And yeah, Haiku is damn responsive in doing so little as it does (that minimal approach might be what is desired of course, but lets be honest here...)

Reply Parent Score: 2