Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 28th Apr 2012 17:19 UTC
Windows I wish more people who work or have worked for large technology companies were as open, honest, and excited as Steve Wozniak still gets over new technology and gadgets. He recently bought a Nokia Lumia 900 - and he's loving it. So much so, in fact, that he claims it's better than Android and iOS in many respects.
Thread beginning with comment 516238
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Comment by kovacm
by MollyC on Sun 29th Apr 2012 17:55 UTC in reply to "Comment by kovacm"
MollyC
Member since:
2006-07-04

Your analysis sounds more like your desire than anything else. For some reason there exists a group of supposed "tech fans" that spend their time rooting for certain tech to fail.

I estimate that 90% of all "WP is doomed" posts has an underlying subtext of "YES!!! I can't wait for WP to disappear from the world forever!!!" as if their own selfworth would be enhanced by such an outcome.

I think Windows 8 will provide a big boost to WP8, and in the US, I think Verizon's announced backing of WP8 will provide a boost as well.

Also, be careful of declaring Android a healthy market, as only Samsung is making real money there. All other OEMs are struggling or outright losing money. And Google itself isn't seeing much return on Android either (mainly because in the mobile space there are so many apps that take the place of mobile web sites, and it's difficult for Google to serve up ads in those apps).

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by kovacm
by JAlexoid on Mon 30th Apr 2012 14:16 in reply to "RE: Comment by kovacm"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

WP7 is doomed, that is a matter of fact.
If Microsoft were to focus and actually stick to WP7, it could have been a success(see XBox as example).

That is the ball and chain on WP's leg - Microsoft's, seeming, lack of ability to stick to it long enough with actual active development.

It's been a year and a few months from the first devices running the newborn WP7 to full refocus on Win8 and WP8(on NT). I don't expect anything amazing from any future updates to WP7, all creative resources will go to Win8 and WP8.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by kovacm
by kovacm on Thu 3rd May 2012 18:51 in reply to "RE: Comment by kovacm"
kovacm Member since:
2010-12-16

in short:

Microsoft bring shity technology to main stream with delay of 7 years.

This is enough for me to hate them from heart.
I watch what they do for past 20 years and I am sure that there is no place for Windows Phone 7 simple because developers wont support them.

Beside Microsoft strategy for tablets (aka Metro and Windows 8) will also fail: it is to little, to late. (they have no other option but to use Windows as vessel for tablet OS but at the end it is again: to little, to late).

I am glad that Apple philosophy will beat Microsoft - software and hardware SHOULD NOT BE SEPARATE ! (all other companies that follow this principle fail (Atari, Amiga, SGI, Sun...): all that companies move things forward but could not fight against "lowest common denominator" that was PC and Microsoft.

Only Apple survive thanx to brilliant moves of Steve Jobs, thanx to NextStep...

I am sure that Microsoft have it's golden years and that they are in decline path. Maybe they will have success in cloud business but smartphone and tablet war is lost for them.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by kovacm
by zima on Sat 5th May 2012 23:59 in reply to "RE: Comment by kovacm"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Also, be careful of declaring Android a healthy market, as only Samsung is making real money there. All other OEMs are struggling or outright losing money.

ZTE (heard of them? ...the 4th largest mobile phone maker, probably quite soon becoming 3rd) isn't struggling, likewise Huawei and such ...new OEMs, just like it happened with PCs, more or less. You might also look into HTC financial reports.

And Google itself isn't seeing much return on Android either (mainly because in the mobile space there are so many apps that take the place of mobile web sites, and it's difficult for Google to serve up ads in those apps).

Just like it is on all platforms. Anyway, the licensing fees alone (for "Google experience" branding) most likely more than offset Android development costs, that's enough for Google (their main goal, "good enough" for them being when no other platform becomes too widespread & able to cut them off from participation in future trends)

Edited 2012-05-06 00:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2