Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 30th Apr 2012 11:53 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Barnes & Noble is spinning off its Nook e-reader business into a new company - which will be a cooperation with Microsoft. Redmond will invest $300 million into the new company, and on top of that, the two companies have settled the patent litigation, which was part of Microsoft's string of mafia practices against Android vendors. I have a sneaking suspicion this will be the end of the line for the Android-based Nook e-readers and tablets. Get 'm while supplies last.
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Damn!
by dsmogor on Mon 30th Apr 2012 12:48 UTC
dsmogor
Member since:
2005-09-01

Looks, like their patents are enforceable. B'n'N was the only company that had balls to fight frontally.
Looks like MS money was sweeter than OS independence. Apparently Amazon success made them less self confident.
Does Amazon pay MS for Android?

Reply Score: 2

RE: Damn!
by MOS6510 on Mon 30th Apr 2012 13:01 in reply to "Damn!"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

Perhaps they were just playing hard to get to get more from a Microsoft take over.

Or maybe they thought they wouldn't survive on a battleground that features Amazon, Apple and Microsoft.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Damn!
by Laurence on Mon 30th Apr 2012 13:31 in reply to "Damn!"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Looks, like their patents are enforceable. B'n'N was the only company that had balls to fight frontally.
Looks like MS money was sweeter than OS independence. Apparently Amazon success made them less self confident.
Does Amazon pay MS for Android?

Sadly we will never know if Microsoft's patents were enforceable. In fact, I wouldn't be at all surprised if Microsoft offered this much money knowing that:
a/ their patents would never be invalidated thus keeping their Android royalties streaming in
b/ guaranteeing a platform to release their new flagship tablet OS.

All in all, this is a clever move by Microsoft.

Edited 2012-04-30 13:32 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Damn!
by shmerl on Mon 30th Apr 2012 18:03 in reply to "RE: Damn!"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

Other way around, they offered that much money knowing that otherwise B&N would invalidate their bogus patents, and it would cause others to start fighting their racket as well. So they just decided to buy off the only resolute fighter. It's a bribe in short. B&N didn't have decency to spit back on it.

Edited 2012-04-30 18:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE: Damn!
by Valhalla on Mon 30th Apr 2012 17:06 in reply to "Damn!"
Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24

I see this simply as Microsoft buying their way out of a bad situation. B&N were calling for the DOJ to investigate Microsoft's patent trolling while also showing patents in question to the world by refusing to accept the 'licence-deal' with it's accompanying NDA.

Yes, it's a shame Microsoft is able to buy itself out of this, but calling it a win?

If anything this shows other potential targets of Microsoft's patent racketeering that when push comes to shove, Microsoft has no interest in actually going to court and have their 'patents' scrutinized.

This certainly is a win for B&N though, they get $300 million 'investment' from Microsoft into a new joint venture where B&N hold 82.4% ownership. For them, if their 'readers' end up running android or windows probably makes little to no difference as they are making their money off content (e-books).

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE: Damn!
by MollyC on Mon 30th Apr 2012 19:06 in reply to "Damn!"
MollyC Member since:
2006-07-04

IIRC, Amazon does pay MS for patent licenses for a bunch of stuff, including Android. But I'm too lazy to verify my recollection. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Damn!
by lemur2 on Tue 1st May 2012 00:53 in reply to "Damn!"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Looks, like their patents are enforceable. B'n'N was the only company that had balls to fight frontally.


Nope. B&N had already eliminated almost all of the patents Microsoft brought against them.

The more probable conclusion is that Microsoft bought B&N in order to avoid an embarrassing loss in the sham case against B&N and thereby ending their extortion racket against Android vendors.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Damn!
by lemur2 on Tue 1st May 2012 04:50 in reply to "RE: Damn!"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"Looks, like their patents are enforceable. B'n'N was the only company that had balls to fight frontally.


Nope. B&N had already eliminated almost all of the patents Microsoft brought against them.

The more probable conclusion is that Microsoft bought B&N in order to avoid an embarrassing loss in the sham case against B&N and thereby ending their extortion racket against Android vendors.
"

Backup:

http://www.muktware.com/news/3563/microsoft-barnes-noble-settle-pat...

"In its signature style Microsoft has settled the patent dispute with Barnes & Noble. The company was losing the legal fight against Barnes & Noble and a court decision certainly was going to trash Microsoft's strategy of ripping Android players over bogus patents.

Microsoft Paying $300 Million In Damages?

As a 'payment' to Barnes & Noble for settling the bogus patent dispute Microsoft is creating a subsidiary for Barnes & Noble with a whooping $300 million investment for 17.6% stake whereas B&N holds 82.4% stake in the new company. This is a smart move by Microsoft to save its image and continue its attack on Android by spinning its 'defeat' in legal fight against B&N as a 'partnership'."

Reply Parent Score: 4