Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 4th May 2012 21:25 UTC
In the News "The FBI is asking Internet companies not to oppose a controversial proposal that would require firms, including Microsoft, Facebook, Yahoo, and Google, to build in backdoors for government surveillance. In meetings with industry representatives, the White House, and U.S. senators, senior FBI officials argue the dramatic shift in communication from the telephone system to the Internet has made it far more difficult for agents to wiretap Americans suspected of illegal activities, CNET has learned. The FBI general counsel's office has drafted a proposed law that the bureau claims is the best solution: requiring that social-networking Web sites and providers of VoIP, instant messaging, and Web e-mail alter their code to ensure their products are wiretap-friendly." I no longer know what to say. You will be monitored by The State. If you oppose such monitoring, you're a terrorist.
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Difficult to implement
by terrakotta on Fri 4th May 2012 21:50 UTC
terrakotta
Member since:
2010-04-21

Wouldn't it be quite easy to have external voip services used in the US? I mean, having the servers that exchange the ip adresses you currently use to establish the direct voip connection somewhere else, so they won't have to abide by the US laws? I don't see how they want to wiretap that. Of course they would gain a lot of information, but those who would want to harm the US (as in, the real terrorists) could still quite easily continue their businesses as usual. While the normal guy/girl is being wiretapped all the time. Counterproductive much? I could be wrong though.

Reply Score: 1

RE: Difficult to implement
by ssokolow on Sat 5th May 2012 07:05 in reply to "Difficult to implement"
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

Wouldn't it be quite easy to have external voip services used in the US? I mean, having the servers that exchange the ip adresses you currently use to establish the direct voip connection somewhere else, so they won't have to abide by the US laws? I don't see how they want to wiretap that. Of course they would gain a lot of information, but those who would want to harm the US (as in, the real terrorists) could still quite easily continue their businesses as usual. While the normal guy/girl is being wiretapped all the time. Counterproductive much? I could be wrong though.


You're not even taking ZRTP encryption for SIP-based VoIP into account, where people read off numbers to verify no man-in-the-middle attack the first time (since we humans are good at checking voices), then all subsequent calls use key continuity to verify security automatically.

(Or, for that matter, OffTheRecord for deniable, end-to-end IM encryption and the authors' plans to develop something similar for SMS)

Edited 2012-05-05 07:24 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4