Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 6th May 2012 10:10 UTC, submitted by bowkota
Google This is absolutely fascinating. Steven Troughton-Smith has gotten his hands on one of the two early Android prototypes - the Google 'Sooner'. The Sooner is the BlackBerry-esque Google phone, which was supposed to be released first, followed by the much more advanced Google Dream (yup, what would eventually become the G1). Lots of high-res screenhots to get a good look at early Android. Update: Fascinating comment.
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the right thing to do
by bowkota on Sun 6th May 2012 14:17 UTC
bowkota
Member since:
2011-10-12

Google recognised immediately the potential of the iPhone and reacted accordingly.
RIM, MS, Nokia simply laughed at it initially, be it its price, the lack of a physical keyboard or its OS. Their ignorance is what lead them to their current situation.

It's sad that we lost Palm along the way. They had some interesting ideas and with the right support I believe they could have succeeded.

Reply Score: 2

RE: the right thing to do
by tanzam75 on Mon 7th May 2012 18:11 in reply to "the right thing to do"
tanzam75 Member since:
2011-05-19

I see this as a classic case of the innovator's dilemma.

RIM, MS, Nokia, Palm, etc. already had customers and were making money on their product.

Google did not.

Edited 2012-05-07 18:12 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: the right thing to do
by zima on Sun 13th May 2012 23:59 in reply to "the right thing to do"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

You make it sound like not having to support tons of existing (and expecting certain stuff) customers, not having to support many existing product lines, was not a major advantage of the newcomers.

And you ignore some facts - for example, the "ignorant" Nokia was, for some time already, working on Maemo (a touchscreen OS, with long-term goal of running on mobile phones when the tech will be ready http://www.osnews.com/thread?498055 - its early tablets were a bit too bulky, and with short battery life... but BTW, N770 and N800 didn't have a keyboard).

Edited 2012-05-14 00:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2